Title

Evaluating Lithic Technology and Function over the last 5,000 years at the Sunrise Ridge Borrow Pit Site, Mount Rainier, Washington

Presenter Information

Heather Hansen

Document Type

Oral Presentation

Location

SURC Ballroom C/D

Start Date

16-5-2013

End Date

16-5-2013

Abstract

Recent human land use models proposed for the Pacific Northwest are firmly embedded in a forager/collector framework that explain the shift in the organization of technology as a function of human efforts to store resources. Evidence of this shift in upland contexts of the Washington Cascade Mountains may only be subtle as environmental constraints there are extreme and may select for a limited tool kit regardless of lowland changes in technology. To investigate changes, if any, over the last 5,000 years we employed a paradigmatic lithic classification to test the hypothesis that there is no major change in lithic technology and function. Preliminary results suggest that changes in lithic technology and function are not subtle during the last 5,000 years. Site components dating to the last 2,000 years have a more diverse lithic assemblage than earlier components. The change in diversity is evaluated in terms of tool stone sources, intra-site structure and sample size constraints. These results suggest that there may have been significant differences brought on by changes in the resource structure in upland contexts, as well as restrictions to exotic tool stone sources.

Poster Number

5

Faculty Mentor(s)

Patrick McCutcheon

Additional Mentoring Department

Anthropology

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May 16th, 8:20 AM May 16th, 10:50 AM

Evaluating Lithic Technology and Function over the last 5,000 years at the Sunrise Ridge Borrow Pit Site, Mount Rainier, Washington

SURC Ballroom C/D

Recent human land use models proposed for the Pacific Northwest are firmly embedded in a forager/collector framework that explain the shift in the organization of technology as a function of human efforts to store resources. Evidence of this shift in upland contexts of the Washington Cascade Mountains may only be subtle as environmental constraints there are extreme and may select for a limited tool kit regardless of lowland changes in technology. To investigate changes, if any, over the last 5,000 years we employed a paradigmatic lithic classification to test the hypothesis that there is no major change in lithic technology and function. Preliminary results suggest that changes in lithic technology and function are not subtle during the last 5,000 years. Site components dating to the last 2,000 years have a more diverse lithic assemblage than earlier components. The change in diversity is evaluated in terms of tool stone sources, intra-site structure and sample size constraints. These results suggest that there may have been significant differences brought on by changes in the resource structure in upland contexts, as well as restrictions to exotic tool stone sources.