Title

Glutathione as an assay for determining the oxidative ability of ultrafine particles

Presenter Information

Joshua Peters

Document Type

Oral Presentation

Location

SURC Ballroom C/D

Start Date

16-5-2013

End Date

16-5-2013

Abstract

Continued development of a quick and acellular means of measuring oxidative stress potental of ultrafine particles (UFPs) has firmly established that UFPs increase the rate at which glutathione (GSH) oxidizes in controlled solutions over time. Several GSH assays were exposed to commercially available soot particles and the rate at which concentration decayed was measured using Dithionitrobenzoic acid (Ellman's reagent) and UV visible spectroscopy. Several additional experimental control experiments such as degradation versus solution temperature and Ellman's reagent degradation due to sunlight were conducted to improve assay precision. Preliminary results have shown that a number of environmental factors such as light, solution temperature, and solution homogeneity have a profound impact on the rate of GSH oxidation. Research into the further optimization of assay parameters is being conducted to minimize the variation due to system independent variables while maintaining the practicality and expedience of the assay.

Poster Number

53

Faculty Mentor(s)

Anne Johansen

Additional Mentoring Department

Environmental Studies

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May 16th, 8:20 AM May 16th, 10:50 AM

Glutathione as an assay for determining the oxidative ability of ultrafine particles

SURC Ballroom C/D

Continued development of a quick and acellular means of measuring oxidative stress potental of ultrafine particles (UFPs) has firmly established that UFPs increase the rate at which glutathione (GSH) oxidizes in controlled solutions over time. Several GSH assays were exposed to commercially available soot particles and the rate at which concentration decayed was measured using Dithionitrobenzoic acid (Ellman's reagent) and UV visible spectroscopy. Several additional experimental control experiments such as degradation versus solution temperature and Ellman's reagent degradation due to sunlight were conducted to improve assay precision. Preliminary results have shown that a number of environmental factors such as light, solution temperature, and solution homogeneity have a profound impact on the rate of GSH oxidation. Research into the further optimization of assay parameters is being conducted to minimize the variation due to system independent variables while maintaining the practicality and expedience of the assay.