Title

Hogue Hall Material Science Water Distiller

Presenter Information

Torrey Kuhlmann

Document Type

Oral Presentation

Location

SURC Ballroom C/D

Start Date

16-5-2013

End Date

16-5-2013

Abstract

The mechanical engineering technology department’s metallurgy course requires students to identify steel alloys as a part of the Jominy end quench test. Steel rods are polished and etched with acid before being magnified and comparing grain structures with known alloys. It is necessary to use distilled water to rinse off the acid solution, thus necessitating the design and construction of a lab distiller. A boiler tank, heat exchanger and cooling reservoir were designed for weight, volume and distilling capacity to meet the needs of the teaching professor. The distiller was designed to have a wet weight of 40 pounds maximum, take up a maximum table volume of two cubic feet while producing 12oz of distilled water per 50 minute class period. Testing the unit with a range of water reservoir temperatures produced changes in distilling efficiency. It was found that the reservoir with average-temperature tap water only successfully produced distilled water at 75percent of its calculated output.

Poster Number

3

Faculty Mentor(s)

Charles Pringle

Additional Mentoring Department

Mechanical Engineering Technology

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May 16th, 2:15 PM May 16th, 4:44 PM

Hogue Hall Material Science Water Distiller

SURC Ballroom C/D

The mechanical engineering technology department’s metallurgy course requires students to identify steel alloys as a part of the Jominy end quench test. Steel rods are polished and etched with acid before being magnified and comparing grain structures with known alloys. It is necessary to use distilled water to rinse off the acid solution, thus necessitating the design and construction of a lab distiller. A boiler tank, heat exchanger and cooling reservoir were designed for weight, volume and distilling capacity to meet the needs of the teaching professor. The distiller was designed to have a wet weight of 40 pounds maximum, take up a maximum table volume of two cubic feet while producing 12oz of distilled water per 50 minute class period. Testing the unit with a range of water reservoir temperatures produced changes in distilling efficiency. It was found that the reservoir with average-temperature tap water only successfully produced distilled water at 75percent of its calculated output.