Title

Iron in Soot: Reactions in the tail pipe

Presenter Information

Hector Casique
Andrew Straub-Walden

Document Type

Oral Presentation

Location

SURC Ballroom C/D

Start Date

16-5-2013

End Date

16-5-2013

Abstract

The automobile is the single greatest polluter, as emissions from a billion vehicles in use add up to a planet-wide problem. During fossil fuel combustion, carbon-containing particles, also called soot, are formed along with other byproducts. These particles contain organic molecules, such as Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) and trace metals, the most predominant of which is iron. Despite indications that oxidized PAH derivatives and reduced iron species are known to contribute to soot toxicity, not much is known about how these compounds are produced during combustion and after emission into the atmosphere. The purpose of this research is to study model iron-soot systems under conditions encountered in the tail pipe and in sunlight to increase our understanding of the iron redox processes that control iron speciation and surface functional groups of the soot. Iron is analyzed spectrophotometrically and soot surfaces will be investigated with an X-Ray Photoelectron Spectrometer at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Results have shown that under reducing environments as well as in sunlight, iron is effectively reduced in the presence of soot. These results indicate that the toxicity of soot depends on tailpipe conditions and on the aging that aerosol particles undergo before inhalation.

Poster Number

52

Faculty Mentor(s)

Anne Johansen

Additional Mentoring Department

Chemistry

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May 16th, 8:20 AM May 16th, 10:50 AM

Iron in Soot: Reactions in the tail pipe

SURC Ballroom C/D

The automobile is the single greatest polluter, as emissions from a billion vehicles in use add up to a planet-wide problem. During fossil fuel combustion, carbon-containing particles, also called soot, are formed along with other byproducts. These particles contain organic molecules, such as Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) and trace metals, the most predominant of which is iron. Despite indications that oxidized PAH derivatives and reduced iron species are known to contribute to soot toxicity, not much is known about how these compounds are produced during combustion and after emission into the atmosphere. The purpose of this research is to study model iron-soot systems under conditions encountered in the tail pipe and in sunlight to increase our understanding of the iron redox processes that control iron speciation and surface functional groups of the soot. Iron is analyzed spectrophotometrically and soot surfaces will be investigated with an X-Ray Photoelectron Spectrometer at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Results have shown that under reducing environments as well as in sunlight, iron is effectively reduced in the presence of soot. These results indicate that the toxicity of soot depends on tailpipe conditions and on the aging that aerosol particles undergo before inhalation.