Title

Parental Perceptions of the Barriers to Continued Participation in Extracurricular Activities for Adolescents with Asperger's Syndrome

Presenter Information

Jamie Gilbert

Document Type

Oral Presentation

Location

SURC Ballroom C/D

Start Date

16-5-2013

End Date

16-5-2013

Abstract

This study examines parental perceptions of the barriers to continued participation in extracurricular activities for adolescents with Asperger’s Syndrome. Identifying these barriers can lead to putting proper supports in place, which in turn can improve participation sustainability. One hundred and five parents of adolescents with Asperger’s Syndrome were anonymously surveyed through an online questionnaire. Seven different types of extracurricular activities, such as social events, art classes, organized sports, and school clubs were evaluated to help understand what barriers could be limiting participation. The study found an association between reported participation frequency and parents’ perceptions of how activities were structured, whether parents felt their children could be equal participants, and parents’ perceptions of how well other children interacted with their adolescent with Asperger’s Syndrome.

Poster Number

42

Faculty Mentor(s)

Sarah Feeney

Additional Mentoring Department

Family and Consumer Sciences

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May 16th, 2:15 PM May 16th, 4:44 PM

Parental Perceptions of the Barriers to Continued Participation in Extracurricular Activities for Adolescents with Asperger's Syndrome

SURC Ballroom C/D

This study examines parental perceptions of the barriers to continued participation in extracurricular activities for adolescents with Asperger’s Syndrome. Identifying these barriers can lead to putting proper supports in place, which in turn can improve participation sustainability. One hundred and five parents of adolescents with Asperger’s Syndrome were anonymously surveyed through an online questionnaire. Seven different types of extracurricular activities, such as social events, art classes, organized sports, and school clubs were evaluated to help understand what barriers could be limiting participation. The study found an association between reported participation frequency and parents’ perceptions of how activities were structured, whether parents felt their children could be equal participants, and parents’ perceptions of how well other children interacted with their adolescent with Asperger’s Syndrome.