Title

Phenotypic Differences of Red-backed Vole (Myodes gapperi) Populations North and South of I-90

Presenter Information

Erin Brimm

Document Type

Oral Presentation

Location

SURC Ballroom C/D

Start Date

16-5-2013

End Date

16-5-2013

Abstract

For more than 100 years, some form of road has cut through the forest east of Snoqualmie Pass. This has presumably separated the red-backed vole (Myodes gapperi) into two populations north and south of the current I-90. With the long-term separation of populations, phenotypic divergence can occur. I tested for differences in size between these populations using specimens that had previously been collected from pitfall traps on either side of I-90 near Keechelus Dam. I measured total body length, tail length, hind foot length, ear length, and weight for both sexes. Preliminary data summary shows a slight difference in average length of 4.5 millimeters, and a weight difference of 1.6 grams with current sample sizes of 11 and 17 for the south and north populations, respectively. I will continue to collect data and analyze the measurements taken from both populations to determine if any of their characteristics have diverged significantly. Any differences in the populations now can be compared with differences in the future after wildlife crossing structures have reconnected these populations.

Poster Number

20

Faculty Mentor(s)

Kristina Ernest

Additional Mentoring Department

Biological Sciences

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May 16th, 8:20 AM May 16th, 10:50 AM

Phenotypic Differences of Red-backed Vole (Myodes gapperi) Populations North and South of I-90

SURC Ballroom C/D

For more than 100 years, some form of road has cut through the forest east of Snoqualmie Pass. This has presumably separated the red-backed vole (Myodes gapperi) into two populations north and south of the current I-90. With the long-term separation of populations, phenotypic divergence can occur. I tested for differences in size between these populations using specimens that had previously been collected from pitfall traps on either side of I-90 near Keechelus Dam. I measured total body length, tail length, hind foot length, ear length, and weight for both sexes. Preliminary data summary shows a slight difference in average length of 4.5 millimeters, and a weight difference of 1.6 grams with current sample sizes of 11 and 17 for the south and north populations, respectively. I will continue to collect data and analyze the measurements taken from both populations to determine if any of their characteristics have diverged significantly. Any differences in the populations now can be compared with differences in the future after wildlife crossing structures have reconnected these populations.