Title

Feeding Time at the Human House by David Weiner

Document Type

Oral Presentation

Location

SURC Theatre

Start Date

15-5-2014

End Date

15-5-2014

Keywords

Connection, Rehearsal, Point-of-view.

Abstract

While competing in the Irene Ryan Acting Competition, we were required to choose, rehearse, and perform two scenes, all while utilizing the skills that we have acquired and have been studying throughout the duration of our time within our respective theatre bachelor of fine arts programs. In order to progress within the competition, we had to make sure that we had done the work required outside of class. This meant that we had to not only memorize the lines within the scene, but work on specific points of view, physicality, and connection to our partners, to help make these scenes as truthful for the auditors as possible. This required research on the subjects that pertained to the characters and the world in which they lived, but also required insight and understanding of the message that the playwright was trying to convey through this work. As well, it required hours upon hours of outside rehearsal to create and solidify movement within each of the pieces, while still keeping in mind the basic principles of staging and directing, so as to not distract the audience and make sure that the movement moved the story along.

Faculty Mentor(s)

Dizney, Patrick

Additional Mentoring Department

Theatre

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May 15th, 2:40 PM May 15th, 3:00 PM

Feeding Time at the Human House by David Weiner

SURC Theatre

While competing in the Irene Ryan Acting Competition, we were required to choose, rehearse, and perform two scenes, all while utilizing the skills that we have acquired and have been studying throughout the duration of our time within our respective theatre bachelor of fine arts programs. In order to progress within the competition, we had to make sure that we had done the work required outside of class. This meant that we had to not only memorize the lines within the scene, but work on specific points of view, physicality, and connection to our partners, to help make these scenes as truthful for the auditors as possible. This required research on the subjects that pertained to the characters and the world in which they lived, but also required insight and understanding of the message that the playwright was trying to convey through this work. As well, it required hours upon hours of outside rehearsal to create and solidify movement within each of the pieces, while still keeping in mind the basic principles of staging and directing, so as to not distract the audience and make sure that the movement moved the story along.