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Presenter Information

Erik Contreras

Location

SURC Room 140

Start Date

15-5-2014

End Date

15-5-2014

Keywords

Protease-inhibitors, Borinic Acids, Antiretroviral drugs"

Abstract

Approximately 34 million people are currently infected with HIV. The only treatment available involves slowing the development of HIV into AIDS, which is done with a cocktail of antiretroviral drugs such as protease inhibitors. This approach is necessary as the virus continually mutates and develops resistance. Further issues arise from the drugs’ low bioavailability, and high toxicity. To circumvent these obstacles, the goal of this research is to develop a synthesis for a potential HIV-1 protease inhibitor. This inhibitor mimics the transition state of the natural substrate, and it interferes with the viral life cycle. Several linear boron modified peptides will be synthesized in the hopes that the analogs will demonstrate a greater inhibitory activity than their non-boronated counterparts

Faculty Mentor(s)

Fabry-Azstalos, Levente Fabry-Azstalos

Additional Mentoring Department

Chemistry

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May 15th, 2:40 PM May 15th, 3:00 PM

Synthesis Towards Straight Chain Borinic Acids as Potential HIV-1 Protease Inhibitors

SURC Room 140

Approximately 34 million people are currently infected with HIV. The only treatment available involves slowing the development of HIV into AIDS, which is done with a cocktail of antiretroviral drugs such as protease inhibitors. This approach is necessary as the virus continually mutates and develops resistance. Further issues arise from the drugs’ low bioavailability, and high toxicity. To circumvent these obstacles, the goal of this research is to develop a synthesis for a potential HIV-1 protease inhibitor. This inhibitor mimics the transition state of the natural substrate, and it interferes with the viral life cycle. Several linear boron modified peptides will be synthesized in the hopes that the analogs will demonstrate a greater inhibitory activity than their non-boronated counterparts