Off-campus CWU users: To download documents with restricted access, please use your Wildcat Connection username and password to log in after clicking on the link below.

Login to Proxy Server

Non-CWU users: Please contact Brooks Library to request access to restricted materials.

Presenter Information

Michael Frank

Location

SURC Room 140

Start Date

15-5-2014

End Date

15-5-2014

Keywords

Pharmaceutical Anthrax Chemistry

Abstract

The bacterium Bacillus anthracis is responsible for the anthrax infection and secretes a toxin composed of three proteins: lethal factor (LF), edema factor (EM), and protective antigen (PA). These toxins persist even if treatment of the bacterial infection takes place and presents a limited window of opportunity for current toxin inhibitors to be administered before widespread necrosis of tissue occurs. Therefore, there is a need for new immediate acting toxin inhibitors. This research is centered on organoboron chemistry for expansion of potential new treatments against acute infection from the biological warfare agent anthrax. This research also illustrates the potential of boron compounds for other medicinal uses and outlines the synthetic versatility of organoboron chemistry. Three novel potential anthrax LF inhibitors will be synthesized. The proposed target compounds will potentially serve as a more effective treatment to toxin damage caused by Bacillus anthracis infection

Faculty Mentor(s)

Fabry-Asztalos, Levente

Additional Mentoring Department

Chemistry

Share

COinS
 
May 15th, 3:20 PM May 15th, 3:40 PM

Synthetic Versatility of Boron: Novel Potential Anthrax Lethal Factor Metalloenzyme Inhibitors and Boron Amino Acid Analogs

SURC Room 140

The bacterium Bacillus anthracis is responsible for the anthrax infection and secretes a toxin composed of three proteins: lethal factor (LF), edema factor (EM), and protective antigen (PA). These toxins persist even if treatment of the bacterial infection takes place and presents a limited window of opportunity for current toxin inhibitors to be administered before widespread necrosis of tissue occurs. Therefore, there is a need for new immediate acting toxin inhibitors. This research is centered on organoboron chemistry for expansion of potential new treatments against acute infection from the biological warfare agent anthrax. This research also illustrates the potential of boron compounds for other medicinal uses and outlines the synthetic versatility of organoboron chemistry. Three novel potential anthrax LF inhibitors will be synthesized. The proposed target compounds will potentially serve as a more effective treatment to toxin damage caused by Bacillus anthracis infection