Title

Flight Attendants: Stars of the Airline Industry

Presenter Information

Shanice Tolbert

Document Type

Oral Presentation

Location

SURC Room 202

Start Date

15-5-2014

End Date

15-5-2014

Keywords

International Tourism, Gender inequality, Airline Industry

Abstract

This presentation will explore the differences and inequalities between United States’ airlines and internationally owned airlines by comparing the treatment of their most visible employee: the flight attendant. For years the airline industry focused their advertising campaigns around the sex appeal of flight attendants over their actual duties, which have more to do with passenger safety than hospitality. Hospitality is an added bonus that passengers receive as part of their inflight experience. When examining these differences, this presentation will review current public perceptions and employer requirements regarding dress and other regulations for flight attendants in their individual nations. Research will also explore how these differences in regulations among the airlines affect their load factors, their target markets, and their influence in the tourism industry. By understanding these differences and inequalities, we can improve the perceptions and equalize the treatment in both US and internationally based airlines.

Faculty Mentor(s)

Chase, Dorothy

Additional Mentoring Department

Family and Consumer Sciences

Additional Mentoring Department

Recreation and Tourism Specialization

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May 15th, 3:20 PM May 15th, 3:40 PM

Flight Attendants: Stars of the Airline Industry

SURC Room 202

This presentation will explore the differences and inequalities between United States’ airlines and internationally owned airlines by comparing the treatment of their most visible employee: the flight attendant. For years the airline industry focused their advertising campaigns around the sex appeal of flight attendants over their actual duties, which have more to do with passenger safety than hospitality. Hospitality is an added bonus that passengers receive as part of their inflight experience. When examining these differences, this presentation will review current public perceptions and employer requirements regarding dress and other regulations for flight attendants in their individual nations. Research will also explore how these differences in regulations among the airlines affect their load factors, their target markets, and their influence in the tourism industry. By understanding these differences and inequalities, we can improve the perceptions and equalize the treatment in both US and internationally based airlines.