Title

Polyelectrolyte/Surfactant Complexes as Reversible Transports to a Modified Silica Surface

Presenter Information

James Siegenthaler

Document Type

Oral Presentation

Location

SURC Room 140

Start Date

15-5-2014

End Date

15-5-2014

Keywords

Surface, Transport, Polyelectrolyte/Surfactant

Abstract

The design and implementation of a controlled chemical transport system could greatly advance switchable chemical reactions and be applicable for targeted drug delivery, intelligent inks, and nanotechnology. This investigation endeavors to create a system utilizing a polyelectrolyte/surfactant complex that can be used as a reversible molecular cargo transport, bringing cargo to a charged surface. The goal is to determine if such a system can be investigated using a quartz crystal micro balance and attenuated total internal reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Modifications of control for this system are to include only changes to the chemical composition of the system including pH, surfactant types, and ionic strength. Preliminary results show that polyelectrolytes and surfactants are indeed attracted to a modified silica surface utilizing pH changes. Further work is to be done investigating the reversibility of these components and the attraction of a polyelectrolyte/surfactant complex to the modified silica surface.

Faculty Mentor(s)

Rivera, Dion

Additional Mentoring Department

Chemistry

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May 15th, 5:10 PM May 15th, 5:30 PM

Polyelectrolyte/Surfactant Complexes as Reversible Transports to a Modified Silica Surface

SURC Room 140

The design and implementation of a controlled chemical transport system could greatly advance switchable chemical reactions and be applicable for targeted drug delivery, intelligent inks, and nanotechnology. This investigation endeavors to create a system utilizing a polyelectrolyte/surfactant complex that can be used as a reversible molecular cargo transport, bringing cargo to a charged surface. The goal is to determine if such a system can be investigated using a quartz crystal micro balance and attenuated total internal reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Modifications of control for this system are to include only changes to the chemical composition of the system including pH, surfactant types, and ionic strength. Preliminary results show that polyelectrolytes and surfactants are indeed attracted to a modified silica surface utilizing pH changes. Further work is to be done investigating the reversibility of these components and the attraction of a polyelectrolyte/surfactant complex to the modified silica surface.