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Presenter Information

Lianne Day

Location

SURC Room 137B

Start Date

15-5-2014

End Date

15-5-2014

Keywords

Taphonomy, Zooarchaeology, Pre-Mazama

Abstract

The Bernard Creek Rockshelter (10IH483) is located in Hell’s Canyon, Idaho, and lies just above the Snake River. The rockshelter was excavated in 1976 by the University of Idaho and four meters of cultural deposits spanning over 7,000 years were discovered. A preliminary analysis was performed on the faunal remains in 1976, but no in-depth taphonomic information was originally recorded. My analysis examined 573 mammal and bird specimens underlying Mazama tephra (ash fall from Mt. Mazama about 7,000 years ago) from 310-370 cm below surface. Preservation was excellent, with 99 percent of specimens exhibiting Stage 0-1 bone weathering. Remains were dominated by large mammals (>70 percent deer size or larger) and included bighorn sheep and deer. Other identified taxa included woodrat, ground squirrel, marmot, canid, porcupine, bear, and rattlesnake. A significant number exhibited modification by humans (including cutmarks, impact damage, and use-wear) with few signs of non-human modification (like gnawing or digestion), which indicates the assemblage is almost entirely accumulated by people.

Faculty Mentor(s)

Lubinski , Patrick

Additional Mentoring Department

Anthropology and Museum Studies

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May 15th, 9:40 AM May 15th, 10:00 AM

A Faunal Sample from Pre-Mazama Levels of the Bernard Creek Rockshelter, Hells Canyon, Idaho

SURC Room 137B

The Bernard Creek Rockshelter (10IH483) is located in Hell’s Canyon, Idaho, and lies just above the Snake River. The rockshelter was excavated in 1976 by the University of Idaho and four meters of cultural deposits spanning over 7,000 years were discovered. A preliminary analysis was performed on the faunal remains in 1976, but no in-depth taphonomic information was originally recorded. My analysis examined 573 mammal and bird specimens underlying Mazama tephra (ash fall from Mt. Mazama about 7,000 years ago) from 310-370 cm below surface. Preservation was excellent, with 99 percent of specimens exhibiting Stage 0-1 bone weathering. Remains were dominated by large mammals (>70 percent deer size or larger) and included bighorn sheep and deer. Other identified taxa included woodrat, ground squirrel, marmot, canid, porcupine, bear, and rattlesnake. A significant number exhibited modification by humans (including cutmarks, impact damage, and use-wear) with few signs of non-human modification (like gnawing or digestion), which indicates the assemblage is almost entirely accumulated by people.