Presenter Information

Olivia Hirschey

Document Type

Oral Presentation

Location

SURC Room 201

Start Date

15-5-2014

End Date

15-5-2014

Keywords

Learning Commons, Student expectations, Benefits to tutoring

Abstract

Within the Central Washington University Academic Research Commons (ARC), the Learning Commons subscribed to a new system of higher education tutoring. The Learning Commons offered students math tutoring, writing tutoring, and supplemental instruction through peer-to-peer, question-based collaborative learning. The Learning Commons launched in winter 2013, and faculty, staff, and administrators have had clear expectations as to its function for students, but one key group has previously been absent from this conversation: students. Understanding students’ expectations for tutorials was vital to both their experiences in the Learning Commons and to knowledge of tutorials. This research assessed the expectations students had for Learning Commons tutoring. The questionnaire surveyed student’s demographics (age, class standing, native language), use of tutoring services (math, writing, supplemental instruction, and study groups), frequency of tutorials, reasons for using tutoring services, and benefits to tutoring services. In order to determine student’s expectations for tutoring services, 231 questionnaires were collected and analyzed to how these expectations align with Learning Commons’ goals and values.

For her work on this project, Olivia Hirschey was presented with the Brooks Library Best Presentation Award for 2014.

Faculty Mentor(s)

Brown, Prairie

Additional Mentoring Department

Learning Commons

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May 15th, 9:40 AM May 15th, 10:00 AM

Assessing the Expectations for Learning Commons Tutoring

SURC Room 201

Within the Central Washington University Academic Research Commons (ARC), the Learning Commons subscribed to a new system of higher education tutoring. The Learning Commons offered students math tutoring, writing tutoring, and supplemental instruction through peer-to-peer, question-based collaborative learning. The Learning Commons launched in winter 2013, and faculty, staff, and administrators have had clear expectations as to its function for students, but one key group has previously been absent from this conversation: students. Understanding students’ expectations for tutorials was vital to both their experiences in the Learning Commons and to knowledge of tutorials. This research assessed the expectations students had for Learning Commons tutoring. The questionnaire surveyed student’s demographics (age, class standing, native language), use of tutoring services (math, writing, supplemental instruction, and study groups), frequency of tutorials, reasons for using tutoring services, and benefits to tutoring services. In order to determine student’s expectations for tutoring services, 231 questionnaires were collected and analyzed to how these expectations align with Learning Commons’ goals and values.

For her work on this project, Olivia Hirschey was presented with the Brooks Library Best Presentation Award for 2014.