Title

Bananas Painted Red: US Neo-Colonialism in the Colombia 1927-1928

Presenter Information

Robert Moser

Document Type

Oral Presentation

Location

SURC Room 271

Start Date

15-5-2014

End Date

15-5-2014

Keywords

Communist Strike Workers

Abstract

I conclude that the early stage of the worker’s revolt and massacre in Santa Marta, Colombia in 1927 is an example of United States’ business imperialism in Colombia. I examined the connection between the United Fruit Company, the Colombian government and the US State department. My research is helping to answer the question of the level of involvement the United States and the United Fruit Company had in the events surrounding the massacre at Santa Marta, Colombia. There are communications from the embassy in Bogota, Colombia to the US State Department covering the beginning stages of the worker’s revolt, and the response from the Colombia government. These consular reports include discussions from the ambassador, to the US State Department, that the Colombia government has given assurances to protect American interests and the interests of the United Fruit Company. The reports further document that the United States and the United Fruit Company stood to benefit from a Colombian government crackdown on labor. These communications take place from November of 1928 to September of 1929. This paper expands on the ties the Colombia government had with the United States, and the ties between both the United States and the Colombia government with the United Fruit Company.

Faculty Mentor(s)

Dormady, Jason

Additional Mentoring Department

History

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May 15th, 9:40 AM May 15th, 10:00 AM

Bananas Painted Red: US Neo-Colonialism in the Colombia 1927-1928

SURC Room 271

I conclude that the early stage of the worker’s revolt and massacre in Santa Marta, Colombia in 1927 is an example of United States’ business imperialism in Colombia. I examined the connection between the United Fruit Company, the Colombian government and the US State department. My research is helping to answer the question of the level of involvement the United States and the United Fruit Company had in the events surrounding the massacre at Santa Marta, Colombia. There are communications from the embassy in Bogota, Colombia to the US State Department covering the beginning stages of the worker’s revolt, and the response from the Colombia government. These consular reports include discussions from the ambassador, to the US State Department, that the Colombia government has given assurances to protect American interests and the interests of the United Fruit Company. The reports further document that the United States and the United Fruit Company stood to benefit from a Colombian government crackdown on labor. These communications take place from November of 1928 to September of 1929. This paper expands on the ties the Colombia government had with the United States, and the ties between both the United States and the Colombia government with the United Fruit Company.