Title

Radiocarbon Dating of Calcined Bone: Pacific Northwest

Presenter Information

James Brown

Document Type

Oral Presentation

Location

SURC Room 137B

Start Date

15-5-2014

End Date

15-5-2014

Keywords

archaeology, anthropology, radiocarbon dating

Abstract

Calcined bone, highly burned bone, survives well in archaeological sites with acidic soils (pH 4.5 to 5.5). These acidic soils are present in archaeological sites along the Northwest coast due to the presence of coniferous forests. Calcined bone has shown to provide accurate radiocarbon ages, if intact apatite can be extracted, processed, and assayed. My CWU Science Honors Research project involves collaborations with DirectAMS Laboratory, creating a protocol for test comparison of calcined bone and radiocarbon dates from seven sites. Petrographic microscope analysis of calcined bone shows there is little to no calcite contamination (from humic acids). Analysis also reveals intact apatite structure, which contains the only obvious carbon in my samples of calcined bone. Accelerated mass spectrometry (AMS) dating of calcined bone samples compare accurately with corresponding dates of charcoal and other bone from all seven sites in my sample. Dating calcined bone from large cooking features will be highly significant for researchers investigating resource intensification along the Northwest coast and within the Columbia Plateau. In these areas, mass food processing and storage were well established by 2500 RCYBP, especially where marine resources and/or tuberous plants were abundant. Radiocarbon dating of calcined bone from three of my sites with large cooking features demonstrates that improved accuracy and efficiency in radiocarbon dating will yield supporting evidence for resource intensification. This evidence will aid in improving our understanding of the ecological and economic factors that drive the development of the Pacific Northwest village pattern.

For this presentation, James Brown received a College of the Sciences Best Oral Presentation Award for 2014.

Faculty Mentor(s)

Hackenberger, Steve; Chatters, James

Additional Mentoring Department

Anthropology and Museum Studies

Additional Mentoring Department

Applied Paleoscience

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
May 15th, 10:00 AM May 15th, 10:20 AM

Radiocarbon Dating of Calcined Bone: Pacific Northwest

SURC Room 137B

Calcined bone, highly burned bone, survives well in archaeological sites with acidic soils (pH 4.5 to 5.5). These acidic soils are present in archaeological sites along the Northwest coast due to the presence of coniferous forests. Calcined bone has shown to provide accurate radiocarbon ages, if intact apatite can be extracted, processed, and assayed. My CWU Science Honors Research project involves collaborations with DirectAMS Laboratory, creating a protocol for test comparison of calcined bone and radiocarbon dates from seven sites. Petrographic microscope analysis of calcined bone shows there is little to no calcite contamination (from humic acids). Analysis also reveals intact apatite structure, which contains the only obvious carbon in my samples of calcined bone. Accelerated mass spectrometry (AMS) dating of calcined bone samples compare accurately with corresponding dates of charcoal and other bone from all seven sites in my sample. Dating calcined bone from large cooking features will be highly significant for researchers investigating resource intensification along the Northwest coast and within the Columbia Plateau. In these areas, mass food processing and storage were well established by 2500 RCYBP, especially where marine resources and/or tuberous plants were abundant. Radiocarbon dating of calcined bone from three of my sites with large cooking features demonstrates that improved accuracy and efficiency in radiocarbon dating will yield supporting evidence for resource intensification. This evidence will aid in improving our understanding of the ecological and economic factors that drive the development of the Pacific Northwest village pattern.

For this presentation, James Brown received a College of the Sciences Best Oral Presentation Award for 2014.