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Presenter Information

Joy Ferry
Patrick McCutcheon

Location

SURC Room 137B

Start Date

15-5-2014

End Date

15-5-2014

Keywords

Archaeology, Mountains, Artifacts.

Abstract

Synchronic comparisons across archaeological components are only possible when artifact classifications are comparable. The 45PI0429 stone tool assemblage from Mount Rainier was analyzed using a similar paradigmatic classification scheme as previously analyzed assemblages (45PI0438, 45PI0406, and 45PI0408). A tephra marker bed (Mt. Saint Helens Yn tephra, ca. 3500-2900 RCYBP) that occurs across most of Mount Rainier’s slopes is used as a consistent stratigraphic marker to define archaeological components for comparisons between the four sites and through time. The MSH-Yn component includes stone tool artifacts excavated from above the MSH-Yn tephra marker bed and below the overlying pre MSH-W paleosol. Later and earlier components consist of stone tool artifacts excavated from below and above the MSH-Yn component. The analytical dimensions compared consisted of fragment type, raw material, reduction trajectory, and thermal alteration. Results indicated significant variability in the distribution of reduction and thermal alteration dimensions through time within the 45PI0429 assemblage, and synchronically between sites. The dimensions fragment type and raw material showed lesser degrees of variability between sites synchronically. These frequencies are consequences of the selective conditions of the environment, and so are representative of variation within stone tool manufacture and use, and representative of adaptation through time and adaptedness to the local environmental conditions. The diachronic and synchronic variation seen in this research may be representative of human responses to the selective conditions of the particular environmental settings.

Faculty Mentor(s)

McCutcheon, Patrick

Additional Mentoring Department

Anthropology and Museum Studies

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May 15th, 10:20 AM May 15th, 10:40 AM

A Diachronic and Synchronic Comparison of Sites 45PI0429, 45PI0438, 45PI0406, and 45PI0408, at Mount Rainier, WA

SURC Room 137B

Synchronic comparisons across archaeological components are only possible when artifact classifications are comparable. The 45PI0429 stone tool assemblage from Mount Rainier was analyzed using a similar paradigmatic classification scheme as previously analyzed assemblages (45PI0438, 45PI0406, and 45PI0408). A tephra marker bed (Mt. Saint Helens Yn tephra, ca. 3500-2900 RCYBP) that occurs across most of Mount Rainier’s slopes is used as a consistent stratigraphic marker to define archaeological components for comparisons between the four sites and through time. The MSH-Yn component includes stone tool artifacts excavated from above the MSH-Yn tephra marker bed and below the overlying pre MSH-W paleosol. Later and earlier components consist of stone tool artifacts excavated from below and above the MSH-Yn component. The analytical dimensions compared consisted of fragment type, raw material, reduction trajectory, and thermal alteration. Results indicated significant variability in the distribution of reduction and thermal alteration dimensions through time within the 45PI0429 assemblage, and synchronically between sites. The dimensions fragment type and raw material showed lesser degrees of variability between sites synchronically. These frequencies are consequences of the selective conditions of the environment, and so are representative of variation within stone tool manufacture and use, and representative of adaptation through time and adaptedness to the local environmental conditions. The diachronic and synchronic variation seen in this research may be representative of human responses to the selective conditions of the particular environmental settings.