Title

The Effects of Native American Folklore on Contemporary Nonfiction Literature

Presenter Information

Megan Epperson

Document Type

Oral Presentation

Location

SURC Room 135

Start Date

15-5-2014

End Date

15-5-2014

Keywords

traditions literature nonfiction analysis cultural stories folklore identity narrative

Abstract

There are a number of contemporary Native American writers, such as Leslie Marmon Silko, Winona LaDuke, and N. Scott Momaday, who draw upon their own traditional culture, incorporating tribal stories and oral traditions into the structure and content of their work. This integration of traditional folklore into modern fiction has become a recognized form in the postcolonial literary tradition. However, the use of Native American traditional stories within the genre of nonfiction, particularly in the construction of the autobiographical narrative merits further analysis. How are contemporary Native American authors informed by their cultural heritage and associated tribal stories and texts? What are the responsibilities and critiques of dominant society that emerge from these orally transmitted values? Using narrative analysis, this paper proposes that tribal stories and cultural heritage have an impact on contemporary Native American nonfiction. Specifically, I will address the development of autobiographical identity and writings.

Faculty Mentor(s)

Hall, Raymond; Culjak, Toni

Additional Mentoring Department

Anthropology and Museum Studies

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May 15th, 11:40 AM May 15th, 12:00 PM

The Effects of Native American Folklore on Contemporary Nonfiction Literature

SURC Room 135

There are a number of contemporary Native American writers, such as Leslie Marmon Silko, Winona LaDuke, and N. Scott Momaday, who draw upon their own traditional culture, incorporating tribal stories and oral traditions into the structure and content of their work. This integration of traditional folklore into modern fiction has become a recognized form in the postcolonial literary tradition. However, the use of Native American traditional stories within the genre of nonfiction, particularly in the construction of the autobiographical narrative merits further analysis. How are contemporary Native American authors informed by their cultural heritage and associated tribal stories and texts? What are the responsibilities and critiques of dominant society that emerge from these orally transmitted values? Using narrative analysis, this paper proposes that tribal stories and cultural heritage have an impact on contemporary Native American nonfiction. Specifically, I will address the development of autobiographical identity and writings.