Title

Women, Role Ethics and Phenomenology: A Critique and Expansion

Presenter Information

Megan Gustafson

Document Type

Oral Presentation

Location

SURC Room 271

Start Date

15-5-2014

End Date

15-5-2014

Keywords

Confucianism, Role Ethics, Gender

Abstract

My presentation is an examination of Confucian Role Ethics through the lens of phenomenology. I will explore the idea that phenomenology implies a set of ethics when studying the humanities (or anything for that matter), but I will focus primarily on religion. I will discuss how dogmatic views on gender can be perpetuated by certain systems of role ethics. I will be using Roger Ames' work as a jumping off point and will be discussing his omission of the female role in his book, Confucian Role Ethics, as it relates to phenomenology. Primarily, I will focus on this omission as un-phenomenological and strive to support that argument and how such hermeneutical errors both ignore and perpetuate the problem of patriarchy. I will discuss my recent experience presenting at the UAA conference “Living Ethically in a Global World”. I will discuss the unique challenge and rewards of critiquing a well-known scholar in my field.

Faculty Mentor(s)

Dippmann, Jeffery

Additional Mentoring Department

Philosophy and Religious Studies

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
May 15th, 12:00 PM May 15th, 12:20 PM

Women, Role Ethics and Phenomenology: A Critique and Expansion

SURC Room 271

My presentation is an examination of Confucian Role Ethics through the lens of phenomenology. I will explore the idea that phenomenology implies a set of ethics when studying the humanities (or anything for that matter), but I will focus primarily on religion. I will discuss how dogmatic views on gender can be perpetuated by certain systems of role ethics. I will be using Roger Ames' work as a jumping off point and will be discussing his omission of the female role in his book, Confucian Role Ethics, as it relates to phenomenology. Primarily, I will focus on this omission as un-phenomenological and strive to support that argument and how such hermeneutical errors both ignore and perpetuate the problem of patriarchy. I will discuss my recent experience presenting at the UAA conference “Living Ethically in a Global World”. I will discuss the unique challenge and rewards of critiquing a well-known scholar in my field.