Off-campus CWU users: To download documents with restricted access, please use your Wildcat Connection username and password to log in after clicking on the link below.

Login to Proxy Server

Non-CWU users: Please contact Brooks Library to request access to restricted materials.

Location

SURC Room 137B

Start Date

15-5-2014

End Date

15-5-2014

Keywords

ArcGIS, Habitat, Restoration

Abstract

Hydrological systems are often engineered by humans, disturbing the natural conditions and the fish and wildlife that rely upon them. There is potential, however, to remediate past mistakes, and return the systems back to a natural state. We employ ArcGIS to describe and analyze natural system benefits gained through alternative rerouting of US Highway 97 along Swauk Creek. Historic air photos from 1942, 1952, and 1954, as well as original surveys and engineering drawings of the highway project, provide insight to the original natural system before the development of Highway 97. Georefencing and digitizing historic air photos allow for an estimate of healthy stream length and migration along with potential riparian zones, including lost flood plain connections and potential water storage. Results of this project will provide the Department of Fish and Wildlife with an alternative proposal to supplement an existing report modeling possible highway realignment and habitat restoration.

Faculty Mentor(s)

Novak, Mathew

Additional Mentoring Department

Geography

Share

COinS
 
May 15th, 8:30 AM May 15th, 8:50 AM

Using GIS to Model Potential Salmon Habitat Restoration in the Swauk Creek/ Highway 97 Corridor

SURC Room 137B

Hydrological systems are often engineered by humans, disturbing the natural conditions and the fish and wildlife that rely upon them. There is potential, however, to remediate past mistakes, and return the systems back to a natural state. We employ ArcGIS to describe and analyze natural system benefits gained through alternative rerouting of US Highway 97 along Swauk Creek. Historic air photos from 1942, 1952, and 1954, as well as original surveys and engineering drawings of the highway project, provide insight to the original natural system before the development of Highway 97. Georefencing and digitizing historic air photos allow for an estimate of healthy stream length and migration along with potential riparian zones, including lost flood plain connections and potential water storage. Results of this project will provide the Department of Fish and Wildlife with an alternative proposal to supplement an existing report modeling possible highway realignment and habitat restoration.