Title

Using Guide Emissions to Assess Far-Infrared Laser Wavelengths

Presenter Information

Brad DeShano
Kerry Olivier
Breeanna Cain

Document Type

Oral Presentation

Location

SURC Room 140

Start Date

15-5-2014

End Date

15-5-2014

Keywords

Optically, Pumped, Laser

Abstract

For the past three years, several teams of undergraduates at Central Washington University have used an optically pumped molecular laser system with a transverse pumping geometry to discover 135 far-infrared laser emissions. Beginning with the investigation into the lasing properties of formic acid and its isotopic forms, a curious pattern emerged while analyzing the data from these studies. When laser emissions with output powers exceeding 0.1 mW were generated, they were often accompanied by a secondary laser emission. These secondary laser emissions were typically at least a factor of ten weaker in power. Additionally, and most importantly, their wavelengths were uniformly larger by a factor of approximately 1.047. In this presentation, an overview of the experimental data will be presented along with several possible hypotheses that will hopefully explain the creation of these secondary laser emissions.

Faculty Mentor(s)

Jackson, Mike; Braunstein, Michael

Additional Mentoring Department

Physics

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May 15th, 12:20 PM May 15th, 12:40 PM

Using Guide Emissions to Assess Far-Infrared Laser Wavelengths

SURC Room 140

For the past three years, several teams of undergraduates at Central Washington University have used an optically pumped molecular laser system with a transverse pumping geometry to discover 135 far-infrared laser emissions. Beginning with the investigation into the lasing properties of formic acid and its isotopic forms, a curious pattern emerged while analyzing the data from these studies. When laser emissions with output powers exceeding 0.1 mW were generated, they were often accompanied by a secondary laser emission. These secondary laser emissions were typically at least a factor of ten weaker in power. Additionally, and most importantly, their wavelengths were uniformly larger by a factor of approximately 1.047. In this presentation, an overview of the experimental data will be presented along with several possible hypotheses that will hopefully explain the creation of these secondary laser emissions.