Title

Effects of Funding on Public School Graduation Rates

Presenter Information

Krystelle Purkey

Document Type

Oral Presentation

Location

SURC Room 137A

Start Date

15-5-2014

End Date

15-5-2014

Keywords

Education, Funding, Graduation

Abstract

The most important resource for the continued prosperity of the United States of America is having highly educated citizens. The Washington State Constitution pledges to provide every child with the opportunity to get a public education by stating that it is, “the paramount duty of the state to make ample provision for the education of all residing within its borders,” (Article IX-Education, 1889). The legislature allocated 42.4 percent of its budget, approximately $13,311,962,000, to fund public school education for the 2009-2010 school year. Each school district was given a various amount of funding by the legislature, which was determined by certain characteristics and necessities of the schools: teacher experience, historical salary levels, class size, educational equipment needs, etc. If there is a direct correlation between educational funding to each school district within Washington State and graduation rates, then the school districts with the most revenue will have the correlating highest rates of graduation. By comparing the all revenues reported in the Financial Reporting Summary for the fiscal year 2009–2010 and the graduation rates stated by the Washington State Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction for the same school year. The research illustrates that there was no clear, direct relationship between the funds and the graduation rates.

Faculty Mentor(s)

Manweller, Matt

Additional Mentoring Department

Political Science

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May 15th, 12:20 PM May 15th, 12:40 PM

Effects of Funding on Public School Graduation Rates

SURC Room 137A

The most important resource for the continued prosperity of the United States of America is having highly educated citizens. The Washington State Constitution pledges to provide every child with the opportunity to get a public education by stating that it is, “the paramount duty of the state to make ample provision for the education of all residing within its borders,” (Article IX-Education, 1889). The legislature allocated 42.4 percent of its budget, approximately $13,311,962,000, to fund public school education for the 2009-2010 school year. Each school district was given a various amount of funding by the legislature, which was determined by certain characteristics and necessities of the schools: teacher experience, historical salary levels, class size, educational equipment needs, etc. If there is a direct correlation between educational funding to each school district within Washington State and graduation rates, then the school districts with the most revenue will have the correlating highest rates of graduation. By comparing the all revenues reported in the Financial Reporting Summary for the fiscal year 2009–2010 and the graduation rates stated by the Washington State Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction for the same school year. The research illustrates that there was no clear, direct relationship between the funds and the graduation rates.