Title

Reduction in the Incidence of Type 2 Diabetes with Shared Medical Appointments: A Patient Centered Outcomes Research Study

Document Type

Oral Presentation

Location

SURC Room 202

Start Date

15-5-2014

End Date

15-5-2014

Keywords

Diabetes, SMA, Rural

Abstract

Each year one out of every ten health care dollars is spent on diabetes and its complications. Currently, in the United States 25.8 million people (8.3 percent of the population) have diabetes. People with diabetes are at risk for heart disease, nerve damage, eye problems, kidney disease, peripheral vascular disease, and many other complications. Treatment options for prevention of type 2 diabetes (DM2) are limited in the general population and are shown to be further limited in rural populations. Treatment for DM2 is not typically instituted until a patient reaches a level of 125 mg/dL fasting plasma glucose (FPG). The purpose of this analysis was to assess the viability of Shared Medical Appointments (SMAs) as prevention of progression from preDM2 (FPG: 100-125 mg/dL) to DM2. The study was a pilot, cross-sectional, patient-centered chart-review involving records from 42 adult patients. A qualitative comparison of proportions was conducted, based on data from a NEJM (n=3234) study of preDM2, which reported 11 percent of preDM2 adults receiving placebo (n=1082), 7.8 percent of those receiving Metformin (n=1073), and 4.8 percent of those receiving lifestyle intervention (n=1079) converted to DM2 within three years. In this analysis, 0 percent (0/42) of the SMA participants with preDM2 converted to DM2 within 3 years. Study results indicate further research is warranted. The sample size was not adequate to achieve sufficient power to conduct a hypothesis test. This analysis showed a reduction in absolute risk for development of DM2 within three years among patients who participated in SMA for at least 12 months.

This presentation received a Guest Invitee Best Presentation Honorable Mention Award, 2014.

Faculty Mentor(s)

Howlett, Bernadette; Haney, Byron

Additional Mentoring Department

Pacific Northwest University of Health Sciences

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May 15th, 12:40 PM May 15th, 1:00 PM

Reduction in the Incidence of Type 2 Diabetes with Shared Medical Appointments: A Patient Centered Outcomes Research Study

SURC Room 202

Each year one out of every ten health care dollars is spent on diabetes and its complications. Currently, in the United States 25.8 million people (8.3 percent of the population) have diabetes. People with diabetes are at risk for heart disease, nerve damage, eye problems, kidney disease, peripheral vascular disease, and many other complications. Treatment options for prevention of type 2 diabetes (DM2) are limited in the general population and are shown to be further limited in rural populations. Treatment for DM2 is not typically instituted until a patient reaches a level of 125 mg/dL fasting plasma glucose (FPG). The purpose of this analysis was to assess the viability of Shared Medical Appointments (SMAs) as prevention of progression from preDM2 (FPG: 100-125 mg/dL) to DM2. The study was a pilot, cross-sectional, patient-centered chart-review involving records from 42 adult patients. A qualitative comparison of proportions was conducted, based on data from a NEJM (n=3234) study of preDM2, which reported 11 percent of preDM2 adults receiving placebo (n=1082), 7.8 percent of those receiving Metformin (n=1073), and 4.8 percent of those receiving lifestyle intervention (n=1079) converted to DM2 within three years. In this analysis, 0 percent (0/42) of the SMA participants with preDM2 converted to DM2 within 3 years. Study results indicate further research is warranted. The sample size was not adequate to achieve sufficient power to conduct a hypothesis test. This analysis showed a reduction in absolute risk for development of DM2 within three years among patients who participated in SMA for at least 12 months.

This presentation received a Guest Invitee Best Presentation Honorable Mention Award, 2014.