Title

Don’t Leave Ergonomics Out of Your Cosntruction Safety Program

Presenter Information

Sathyanarayanan Rajendran

Document Type

Oral Presentation

Location

SURC Room 202

Start Date

15-5-2014

End Date

15-5-2014

Keywords

Construction safety, work-related musculoskeletal disorders, worker training, ergonomics, hazard

Abstract

Work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSDs) continue to be a major concern for the construction industry. It is critical for construction workers to be educated on ergonomic risk factors (ERFs) to reduce/prevent WMSDs. Current trends on worker training pertaining to ERFs, workers’ perception towards ERFs and their ability to identify and control them has not been studied. This study aims to fill this gap with the following objectives: (1) to identify the construction crafts’ perception of ERFs compared to other hazards; (2) to understand the trends in worker training pertaining to ERFs; and (3) to report the construction crafts’ current ability to identify and control ERFs. The study methodology involved the development and distribution of a short questionnaire. Questionnaires were received from 315 construction workers from the western United States. It was found that majority of the workers perceive ERFs as a major hazard and discuss ERFs regularly during their pre-task meetings. However, it was found that a staggering 28 percent have not received any training on ergonomic interventions. Review of crew pre-task plans suggested that only 40 percent of the workers identified and controlled ERFs. It is evident the construction community has an opportunity to reduce WMSDs by proper worker training on ERFs.

Faculty Mentor(s)

Rajendran, Sathyanarayanan

Additional Mentoring Department

Engineering Technologies, Safety, and Construction

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May 15th, 1:50 PM May 15th, 2:10 PM

Don’t Leave Ergonomics Out of Your Cosntruction Safety Program

SURC Room 202

Work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSDs) continue to be a major concern for the construction industry. It is critical for construction workers to be educated on ergonomic risk factors (ERFs) to reduce/prevent WMSDs. Current trends on worker training pertaining to ERFs, workers’ perception towards ERFs and their ability to identify and control them has not been studied. This study aims to fill this gap with the following objectives: (1) to identify the construction crafts’ perception of ERFs compared to other hazards; (2) to understand the trends in worker training pertaining to ERFs; and (3) to report the construction crafts’ current ability to identify and control ERFs. The study methodology involved the development and distribution of a short questionnaire. Questionnaires were received from 315 construction workers from the western United States. It was found that majority of the workers perceive ERFs as a major hazard and discuss ERFs regularly during their pre-task meetings. However, it was found that a staggering 28 percent have not received any training on ergonomic interventions. Review of crew pre-task plans suggested that only 40 percent of the workers identified and controlled ERFs. It is evident the construction community has an opportunity to reduce WMSDs by proper worker training on ERFs.