Title

Light Curve of SN2014J

Presenter Information

Hans Berghoff

Document Type

Oral Presentation

Location

SURC Ballroom C/D

Start Date

15-5-2014

End Date

15-5-2014

Keywords

SN2014J, Light Curve, Type Ia Supernova

Abstract

On January 21, 2014, during an undergraduate teaching lesson, observers at the University of London discovered a supernova in Messier 82 approximately 11 million light years away. This supernova, identified as SN2014J, is classified as a type Ia supernova which occurs when a white dwarf accretes sufficient mass from its companion star to undergo fusion in its carbon-oxygen core. This sudden onset of fusion releases more energy than our Sun will in its entire lifetime in a time frame of months, and destroys the white dwarf. Furthermore, type Ia supernovae play the crucial role of a standard candle that is used to define and measure the cosmic distance scale. Photometric data collection for SN2014J with the Central Washington University Observatory 0.3m telescope started on January 31, 2014 when the supernova had reached its peak brightness and will continue until SN2014J is too dim to distinguish from its host galaxy. Data was collected with Kron-Cousins visible band (V) and infrared band (I) filters. After reducing the raw images and performing differential photometry measurements, a light curve was constructed that shows SN2014J decreasing in brightness as time progresses. When combined with data obtained by other observers, the resulting light curves can contribute to understanding how type Ia supernovae evolve and change as a function of time.

Poster Number

4

Faculty Mentor(s)

Braunstein, Michael

Additional Mentoring Department

Physics

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May 15th, 8:30 AM May 15th, 11:00 AM

Light Curve of SN2014J

SURC Ballroom C/D

On January 21, 2014, during an undergraduate teaching lesson, observers at the University of London discovered a supernova in Messier 82 approximately 11 million light years away. This supernova, identified as SN2014J, is classified as a type Ia supernova which occurs when a white dwarf accretes sufficient mass from its companion star to undergo fusion in its carbon-oxygen core. This sudden onset of fusion releases more energy than our Sun will in its entire lifetime in a time frame of months, and destroys the white dwarf. Furthermore, type Ia supernovae play the crucial role of a standard candle that is used to define and measure the cosmic distance scale. Photometric data collection for SN2014J with the Central Washington University Observatory 0.3m telescope started on January 31, 2014 when the supernova had reached its peak brightness and will continue until SN2014J is too dim to distinguish from its host galaxy. Data was collected with Kron-Cousins visible band (V) and infrared band (I) filters. After reducing the raw images and performing differential photometry measurements, a light curve was constructed that shows SN2014J decreasing in brightness as time progresses. When combined with data obtained by other observers, the resulting light curves can contribute to understanding how type Ia supernovae evolve and change as a function of time.