Title

Range Land Policy Impact on Riparian Habitat

Presenter Information

Christopher Nash

Document Type

Oral Presentation

Location

SURC Ballroom C/D

Start Date

15-5-2014

End Date

15-5-2014

Keywords

policy, environment, riparian habitat, range land

Abstract

This poster displays how livestock and range land management practices have affected our riparian habitats in Washington State and the United States. Currently, livestock on range land disrupt the other natural ecosystems which coincide with it. These systems (forest and riparian) are becoming altered by the grazing patterns and presence of livestock, which result in stream bank erosion, loss of vital vegetation, and the large amounts of waste produced by livestock, which concurrently is one of the largest categories of non-point source pollution that is deposited into our state’s and nation’s rivers, streams and estuaries. Range land management practices have in large, been unaltered since the days of pioneers and transcendentalism. Newer modern practices should be put into policy which reflect our current scientific knowledge of how the management of these range lands can better coincide with the natural systems that surround them.

Poster Number

10

Faculty Mentor(s)

Wirth, Rex

Additional Mentoring Department

Environmental Studies

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May 15th, 11:30 AM May 15th, 2:00 PM

Range Land Policy Impact on Riparian Habitat

SURC Ballroom C/D

This poster displays how livestock and range land management practices have affected our riparian habitats in Washington State and the United States. Currently, livestock on range land disrupt the other natural ecosystems which coincide with it. These systems (forest and riparian) are becoming altered by the grazing patterns and presence of livestock, which result in stream bank erosion, loss of vital vegetation, and the large amounts of waste produced by livestock, which concurrently is one of the largest categories of non-point source pollution that is deposited into our state’s and nation’s rivers, streams and estuaries. Range land management practices have in large, been unaltered since the days of pioneers and transcendentalism. Newer modern practices should be put into policy which reflect our current scientific knowledge of how the management of these range lands can better coincide with the natural systems that surround them.