Title

Marine Rope Winder

Presenter Information

Samuel Holt

Document Type

Oral Presentation

Location

SURC Ballroom C/D

Start Date

15-5-2014

End Date

15-5-2014

Keywords

TORQUE, ENGINEERING, STRENGTH OF MATERIALS

Abstract

During a water sport activity that involved the use of a tow rope, it was often difficult to pull the rope in and coil it up at the same time. The water sport activity could include, but was not limited to water tubing, water skiing, and fishing with anchor lines. A device was created that could pull in the rope as well as simultaneously wind it up. Once the rope was coiled up, it could be removed from the device while still allowing it to remain in a coil. The device was built using engineering techniques and principles that included the disciplines of statics and strength of materials. The device was designed with a 96-watt DC-geared motor that produced approximately 13.5 ft-lbs. of torque. This amount of torque made it possible to tow in a load of 300 pounds floating on the water. The materials used to construct the device were polypropylene, aluminum, and plywood. These materials enabled the device to be light weight, strong, and able to float in the event that it fell into the water. The Marine Rope Winder was sufficient in its ability to tow in a rope, as well as, allow it to be removed and remain coiled up. More testing has been scheduled to be completed during spring quarter 2014.

Poster Number

14

Faculty Mentor(s)

Pringle, Charles

Additional Mentoring Department

Engineering Technologies, Safety, and Construction

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May 15th, 2:29 PM May 15th, 5:00 PM

Marine Rope Winder

SURC Ballroom C/D

During a water sport activity that involved the use of a tow rope, it was often difficult to pull the rope in and coil it up at the same time. The water sport activity could include, but was not limited to water tubing, water skiing, and fishing with anchor lines. A device was created that could pull in the rope as well as simultaneously wind it up. Once the rope was coiled up, it could be removed from the device while still allowing it to remain in a coil. The device was built using engineering techniques and principles that included the disciplines of statics and strength of materials. The device was designed with a 96-watt DC-geared motor that produced approximately 13.5 ft-lbs. of torque. This amount of torque made it possible to tow in a load of 300 pounds floating on the water. The materials used to construct the device were polypropylene, aluminum, and plywood. These materials enabled the device to be light weight, strong, and able to float in the event that it fell into the water. The Marine Rope Winder was sufficient in its ability to tow in a rope, as well as, allow it to be removed and remain coiled up. More testing has been scheduled to be completed during spring quarter 2014.