Title

Parachute Mount for Mitsubishi Evolution

Presenter Information

Kyle Wilkinson

Document Type

Oral Presentation

Location

SURC Ballroom C/D

Start Date

15-5-2014

End Date

15-5-2014

Keywords

Stress, weight, parachute

Abstract

The National Hot Rod Association requires any vehicle traveling faster than 150mph in the quarter-mile to be equipped with a parachute. Currently in industry there is not a parachute mount available for a Mitsubishi Evolution, that is both light weight and low cost. This paper contains an evaluation of strength versus weight for every component of the parachute mount. This was done by first determining the maximum force created by the parachute. Using this information, working from where the parachute anchors to where the mount connects to the vehicle, the minimum thickness and material were determined for the least amount of weight. The results will be determined by applying various loads to the prototype mount to measure the stresses and strains created by the parachute, then compare to the calculated predictions.

Poster Number

4

Faculty Mentor(s)

Pringle, Charles

Additional Mentoring Department

Engineering Technologies, Safety, and Construction

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May 15th, 2:29 PM May 15th, 5:00 PM

Parachute Mount for Mitsubishi Evolution

SURC Ballroom C/D

The National Hot Rod Association requires any vehicle traveling faster than 150mph in the quarter-mile to be equipped with a parachute. Currently in industry there is not a parachute mount available for a Mitsubishi Evolution, that is both light weight and low cost. This paper contains an evaluation of strength versus weight for every component of the parachute mount. This was done by first determining the maximum force created by the parachute. Using this information, working from where the parachute anchors to where the mount connects to the vehicle, the minimum thickness and material were determined for the least amount of weight. The results will be determined by applying various loads to the prototype mount to measure the stresses and strains created by the parachute, then compare to the calculated predictions.