Title

The Impact of Video Games on Working Memory

Document Type

Oral Presentation

Location

SURC Ballroom C/D

Start Date

15-5-2014

End Date

15-5-2014

Keywords

Memory, EEG/ERP, Video Games

Abstract

The Entertainment Software Rating Board (ESRB) estimates that the average US household owns at least one video game console, and of those that do, 49 percent own an average of two consoles. In addition, the ESRB also notes that 66 percent of parents believe video games offer mental stimulation or education. To date, few studies have studies have analyzed the impact of video game play on cognition. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the impact of video games on both behavioral and neurophysiological measures (event-related potentials) of working memory. Stimuli used during the neurophysiological portion of the study were based on the visual odd-ball paradigm in which participants had to respond to standard and rare occurring visual targets, while working memory was evaluated using the TOMAL-2 (Test of Memory and Learning 2nd edition). Results revealed no significant differences between gamers and non-gamers on the TOMAL-2 and reaction time. However, analysis of the event-related potentials data revealed differences in the two groups, with gamers having a larger brain response than non-gamers.

Poster Number

50

Faculty Mentor(s)

Greenwald, Ralf

Additional Mentoring Department

Psychology

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May 15th, 2:29 PM May 15th, 5:00 PM

The Impact of Video Games on Working Memory

SURC Ballroom C/D

The Entertainment Software Rating Board (ESRB) estimates that the average US household owns at least one video game console, and of those that do, 49 percent own an average of two consoles. In addition, the ESRB also notes that 66 percent of parents believe video games offer mental stimulation or education. To date, few studies have studies have analyzed the impact of video game play on cognition. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the impact of video games on both behavioral and neurophysiological measures (event-related potentials) of working memory. Stimuli used during the neurophysiological portion of the study were based on the visual odd-ball paradigm in which participants had to respond to standard and rare occurring visual targets, while working memory was evaluated using the TOMAL-2 (Test of Memory and Learning 2nd edition). Results revealed no significant differences between gamers and non-gamers on the TOMAL-2 and reaction time. However, analysis of the event-related potentials data revealed differences in the two groups, with gamers having a larger brain response than non-gamers.