Title

Corporal Punishment and its Relationship to Adjustment and Educational Attainment

Document Type

Oral Presentation

Location

SURC Ballroom C/D

Start Date

15-5-2014

End Date

15-5-2014

Keywords

Punishment, Adjustment, Education

Abstract

Our research investigates the impact of corporal punishment on adjustment and level of education obtained as well as the effect of educational attainment on the use of corporal punishment. Survey responses from a sample of 220 adults between the ages of 30 and 50 were analyzed. Results showed that those who experienced severe corporal punishment (as opposed to mild) at any age reported higher perceived (negative) impact on at least one aspect of adjustment. The areas of adjustment that were studied were behavior, attitude, self-esteem, and relationship with parent. Among participants that reported receiving severe corporal punishment between ages 11–15, all four areas of adjustment were poorer. No relationship was found between corporal punishment in childhood and participants’ level of education in midlife; however, reported use of corporal punishment as discipline was significantly different based on the level of education obtained. Fewer participants with higher levels of education reported using corporal punishment on their own children than those with lower levels of education. The results of our study suggest that a relationship exists between corporal punishment and adjustment level; however, our study is limited due to the data being based on retrospective reports. Further research would improve the understanding of this topic through the use of longitudinal designs. According to our findings, future research should be focused on the age range of early adolescence.

Poster Number

33

Faculty Mentor(s)

Feeney, Sarah

Additional Mentoring Department

Family and Consumer Sciences

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May 15th, 2:29 PM May 15th, 5:00 PM

Corporal Punishment and its Relationship to Adjustment and Educational Attainment

SURC Ballroom C/D

Our research investigates the impact of corporal punishment on adjustment and level of education obtained as well as the effect of educational attainment on the use of corporal punishment. Survey responses from a sample of 220 adults between the ages of 30 and 50 were analyzed. Results showed that those who experienced severe corporal punishment (as opposed to mild) at any age reported higher perceived (negative) impact on at least one aspect of adjustment. The areas of adjustment that were studied were behavior, attitude, self-esteem, and relationship with parent. Among participants that reported receiving severe corporal punishment between ages 11–15, all four areas of adjustment were poorer. No relationship was found between corporal punishment in childhood and participants’ level of education in midlife; however, reported use of corporal punishment as discipline was significantly different based on the level of education obtained. Fewer participants with higher levels of education reported using corporal punishment on their own children than those with lower levels of education. The results of our study suggest that a relationship exists between corporal punishment and adjustment level; however, our study is limited due to the data being based on retrospective reports. Further research would improve the understanding of this topic through the use of longitudinal designs. According to our findings, future research should be focused on the age range of early adolescence.