Presenter Information

Benjamin Richardson

Document Type

Oral Presentation

Location

SURC Ballroom C/D

Start Date

15-5-2014

End Date

15-5-2014

Keywords

Video Games, Psychology, Reaction Times

Abstract

This study represents the first phase of a broader study investigating potential brain processing differences between video gamers and non-gamers. The purpose of the current study was to investigate reaction times to visual stimuli in individuals who regularly play action games versus individuals who do not. Stimuli used were based on the visual oddball paradigm in which participants respond to standard and rare occurring visual targets. Results indicate that the speed of decision-making and reaction are increased for those who regularly play video games, and had started playing video games at a younger age. Findings suggest an interacting effect of years experience with video games, and gamer or non-gamer identifying status as determined by the average amount of game play per week. The current results have implications for possible neural processing differences concerning working memory in individuals who have more experience with video games.

For this presentation, Benjamin Richardson received a College of the Sciences Best Poster Presentation Award for 2014.

Poster Number

49

Faculty Mentor(s)

Greenwald, Ralf

Additional Mentoring Department

Psychology

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May 15th, 2:29 PM May 15th, 5:00 PM

Reaction Time Differences in Video Game and Non-Video Game Players

SURC Ballroom C/D

This study represents the first phase of a broader study investigating potential brain processing differences between video gamers and non-gamers. The purpose of the current study was to investigate reaction times to visual stimuli in individuals who regularly play action games versus individuals who do not. Stimuli used were based on the visual oddball paradigm in which participants respond to standard and rare occurring visual targets. Results indicate that the speed of decision-making and reaction are increased for those who regularly play video games, and had started playing video games at a younger age. Findings suggest an interacting effect of years experience with video games, and gamer or non-gamer identifying status as determined by the average amount of game play per week. The current results have implications for possible neural processing differences concerning working memory in individuals who have more experience with video games.

For this presentation, Benjamin Richardson received a College of the Sciences Best Poster Presentation Award for 2014.