Title

Evaluation of the toxicity to mammalian cells of plant extracts with anthelminthic activity

Presenter Information

Jocelyn McCornack

Document Type

Oral Presentation

Location

SURC Ballroom C/D

Start Date

15-5-2014

End Date

15-5-2014

Keywords

Hookworm, Treatments, Toxicity

Abstract

Hookworm infection is one of the most common and important tropical diseases in the world, affecting over 700 million people within impoverished areas worldwide. Frequent deworming with benzimidazoles is the current treatment. However, this method has begun to show resistance, rendering it necessary to develop new treatments. Despite the need, research and production has been essentially neglected for the past three decades because drug development for impoverished areas provides little commercial gain. Within Dr. Blaise Dondji’s lab and in collaboration with Dr. Gil Belofsky, the plants Dalea ornata and Oemlaria cerasiformis have already shown in vitro activity against hookworm, but their toxicity remains to be tested. My current plan will be to test the toxicity of the plants to mammalian cells because they must demonstrate their safety before in vivo testing. Safety will be assessed by measuring the death and efficiency of cell division using C2C12 mouse myoblasts and hamster spleen cells.

Poster Number

19

Faculty Mentor(s)

Dondji, Blaise

Additional Mentoring Department

Biological Sciences

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May 15th, 8:30 AM May 15th, 11:00 AM

Evaluation of the toxicity to mammalian cells of plant extracts with anthelminthic activity

SURC Ballroom C/D

Hookworm infection is one of the most common and important tropical diseases in the world, affecting over 700 million people within impoverished areas worldwide. Frequent deworming with benzimidazoles is the current treatment. However, this method has begun to show resistance, rendering it necessary to develop new treatments. Despite the need, research and production has been essentially neglected for the past three decades because drug development for impoverished areas provides little commercial gain. Within Dr. Blaise Dondji’s lab and in collaboration with Dr. Gil Belofsky, the plants Dalea ornata and Oemlaria cerasiformis have already shown in vitro activity against hookworm, but their toxicity remains to be tested. My current plan will be to test the toxicity of the plants to mammalian cells because they must demonstrate their safety before in vivo testing. Safety will be assessed by measuring the death and efficiency of cell division using C2C12 mouse myoblasts and hamster spleen cells.