Title

Designing a Trap to Attract and Capture Kissing Bugs in Jalisco, Mexico.

Presenter Information

Analiese Wenger
Craig Fergus

Document Type

Oral Presentation

Location

SURC Ballroom C/D

Start Date

15-5-2014

End Date

15-5-2014

Keywords

Chagas Disease, Kissing Bugs, Trapping

Abstract

Our objective was to design a mechanism that effectively attracts and captures Triatominae species, also known as kissing bugs, in the field. These insects carry the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi and are the major vector for Chagas Disease throughout the Americas. By designing a dependable method of capturing these bugs, we hoped to aid in future efforts to study, and potentially prevent transmission of the disease. The study was performed at Estación de Biología Chamela in Jalisco, Mexico, where Triatoma pallidipennis had previously been recorded and several Triatoma individuals were found during our study. Each trap consisted of a 14-inch long plastic tube, covered at both ends with a cone of wire mesh that led to into the tube. At the end of the mesh cone was a bug-sized opening angled such that the insect would fall into the trap and not be able to climb out. Three attractant methods were used: light, a previously-captured live kissing bug, and a CO2 emitter created by combining live yeast with sugar and flour. Over three nights, traps were placed in a variety of configurations centered around a set of pitfalls traps known to have successfully captured Triatoma in the past. Unfortunately, no Triatoma were captured in any of the traps despite continued captures in the pitfalls. We believe that this failure may be due to the CO2 emissions being too low or the wire mesh being a deterrent to Triatoma movements. Future studies may look to rectify these concerns.

Poster Number

34

Faculty Mentor(s)

Beck, Daniel; Stryker, Gabrielle; Ely, Lisa

Additional Mentoring Department

Biological Sciences

Additional Mentoring Department

Geological Sciences

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
May 15th, 8:30 AM May 15th, 11:00 AM

Designing a Trap to Attract and Capture Kissing Bugs in Jalisco, Mexico.

SURC Ballroom C/D

Our objective was to design a mechanism that effectively attracts and captures Triatominae species, also known as kissing bugs, in the field. These insects carry the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi and are the major vector for Chagas Disease throughout the Americas. By designing a dependable method of capturing these bugs, we hoped to aid in future efforts to study, and potentially prevent transmission of the disease. The study was performed at Estación de Biología Chamela in Jalisco, Mexico, where Triatoma pallidipennis had previously been recorded and several Triatoma individuals were found during our study. Each trap consisted of a 14-inch long plastic tube, covered at both ends with a cone of wire mesh that led to into the tube. At the end of the mesh cone was a bug-sized opening angled such that the insect would fall into the trap and not be able to climb out. Three attractant methods were used: light, a previously-captured live kissing bug, and a CO2 emitter created by combining live yeast with sugar and flour. Over three nights, traps were placed in a variety of configurations centered around a set of pitfalls traps known to have successfully captured Triatoma in the past. Unfortunately, no Triatoma were captured in any of the traps despite continued captures in the pitfalls. We believe that this failure may be due to the CO2 emissions being too low or the wire mesh being a deterrent to Triatoma movements. Future studies may look to rectify these concerns.