Title

Measuring Quantitative Literacy through Electronic Data Collection

Presenter Information

Emily Beemer
Tarra Hall

Document Type

Oral Presentation

Location

SURC Ballroom C/D

Start Date

15-5-2014

End Date

15-5-2014

Keywords

Quantitative Literacy, Chemical Education, Computer-Based Technology

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to determine if the implementation of Electronic Data Collection Devices (EDCD) into our lab activity would clearly cause an increase in a students’ comprehension of a concept and the ability to quantitatively support a scientific argument. Current research students in the Sorey Group assessed CHEM 180 series students with pre/post lab quizzes, teaching assistant observation of students, and student generated lab reports. To analyze the data collected, a “Theory of Affordance” and “Quantitative Literacy” was applied to assess inquiry-based laboratories that integrate electronic data collection devices (EDCD). This technology was assessed in five broad areas that may directly affect the quality of educational experiments at Central Washington University; (1) graphical display of data, (2) time, (3) error, (4) ease of use and (5) other physical affordances during data acquisition. Instructors will use the results from this study to inform teaching practice and increase teaching effectiveness.

Poster Number

11

Faculty Mentor(s)

Sorey, Timothy

Additional Mentoring Department

Chemistry

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May 15th, 8:30 AM May 15th, 11:00 AM

Measuring Quantitative Literacy through Electronic Data Collection

SURC Ballroom C/D

The purpose of this study was to determine if the implementation of Electronic Data Collection Devices (EDCD) into our lab activity would clearly cause an increase in a students’ comprehension of a concept and the ability to quantitatively support a scientific argument. Current research students in the Sorey Group assessed CHEM 180 series students with pre/post lab quizzes, teaching assistant observation of students, and student generated lab reports. To analyze the data collected, a “Theory of Affordance” and “Quantitative Literacy” was applied to assess inquiry-based laboratories that integrate electronic data collection devices (EDCD). This technology was assessed in five broad areas that may directly affect the quality of educational experiments at Central Washington University; (1) graphical display of data, (2) time, (3) error, (4) ease of use and (5) other physical affordances during data acquisition. Instructors will use the results from this study to inform teaching practice and increase teaching effectiveness.