Title

Investigating the Anatomy of the Stylohyoid Bone of Hoofed Mammals for Archaeological Interpretation

Presenter Information

Sydney Hanson
Eric Wakeland
Thomas Hale

Document Type

Oral Presentation

Location

SURC Ballroom C/D

Start Date

15-5-2014

End Date

15-5-2014

Keywords

Archaeology, Zooarchaeology, Anthropology

Abstract

Hyoid bones are part of a complex of small bones in the throat region of mammals, including hoofed mammals (artiodactyls). Many archaeological sites with faunal remains lack hyoid bones; however, hyoid bones do occur in sites with large numbers of artiodactyl remains. Hyoid bones have been recovered with butchery marks and used as ornaments in archaeological sites across the Plains and Eastern United States. Hyoid bones are poorly known to many zooarchaeologists, and simple questions, such as how to side these bones, have not been well resolved. This project involved extracting hyoid bones in place from multiple artiodactyls to ensure an adequate sample for determining side, as well as adding to a sample for identifying artiodactyl species. This poster will provide examples of stylohyoid bones from archaeological sites, as well as information for determining side, which is important for the interpretation of cut marks on these bones.

Poster Number

37

Faculty Mentor(s)

Lubinski, Patrick

Additional Mentoring Department

Anthropology and Museum Studies

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May 15th, 11:30 AM May 15th, 2:00 PM

Investigating the Anatomy of the Stylohyoid Bone of Hoofed Mammals for Archaeological Interpretation

SURC Ballroom C/D

Hyoid bones are part of a complex of small bones in the throat region of mammals, including hoofed mammals (artiodactyls). Many archaeological sites with faunal remains lack hyoid bones; however, hyoid bones do occur in sites with large numbers of artiodactyl remains. Hyoid bones have been recovered with butchery marks and used as ornaments in archaeological sites across the Plains and Eastern United States. Hyoid bones are poorly known to many zooarchaeologists, and simple questions, such as how to side these bones, have not been well resolved. This project involved extracting hyoid bones in place from multiple artiodactyls to ensure an adequate sample for determining side, as well as adding to a sample for identifying artiodactyl species. This poster will provide examples of stylohyoid bones from archaeological sites, as well as information for determining side, which is important for the interpretation of cut marks on these bones.