Title

Bare Hands Learning Resource

Presenter Information

Kimberly Hager
Christopher Phillips

Document Type

Oral Presentation

Location

SURC 301

Start Date

21-5-2015

End Date

21-5-2015

Keywords

Business Plan Competition, American Sign Language, Website

Abstract

BHLR will provide services to people who possess the skill of sign language, such as a parent of deaf children, deaf adults, teachers, or interpreters for the deaf. BHLR focuses on developing a learning resource website accessible through the internet, with the goal to provide free service for people to use. This website will include a variety of educational videos that use American Sign Language and visual effects programs to better enhance the experience. The deaf community is known to rely heavily on visual communication and visual stimulus. Many deaf children and adults do not have reliable access to a learning resource, and most cannot afford to get a tutor or to enroll in a college where there is a lack of “know how” to communicate and teach in the child’s native language, which is usually American Sign Language.

Faculty Mentor(s)

Jer Loudenbach

Additional Mentoring Department

World Languages

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May 21st, 11:20 AM May 21st, 11:50 AM

Bare Hands Learning Resource

SURC 301

BHLR will provide services to people who possess the skill of sign language, such as a parent of deaf children, deaf adults, teachers, or interpreters for the deaf. BHLR focuses on developing a learning resource website accessible through the internet, with the goal to provide free service for people to use. This website will include a variety of educational videos that use American Sign Language and visual effects programs to better enhance the experience. The deaf community is known to rely heavily on visual communication and visual stimulus. Many deaf children and adults do not have reliable access to a learning resource, and most cannot afford to get a tutor or to enroll in a college where there is a lack of “know how” to communicate and teach in the child’s native language, which is usually American Sign Language.