Title

A Composite Brake Rotor Assembly by Utilizing Replaceable Friction Surfaces

Presenter Information

John Evert

Document Type

Oral Presentation

Location

SURC Ballroom B/C/D

Start Date

21-5-2015

End Date

21-5-2015

Keywords

Temperature, Replaceable, Braking

Abstract

This project investigated a proof of concept design involving a rotor fabricated from aluminum with replaceable friction surfaces with greater or equal performance characteristics in order to reduce cost and maintenance. The replaceable friction surfaces provide a means to mitigate cost to the end user. The structure is constrained by the dimensions, 11.75” diameter and 1.25” width, and serves as a direct replacement rotor for a circle track racecar. Analyses provide a direct comparison in static mass, moments of inertia, and forced convection thermal calculations in order to determine if the concept was viable. Requirements for a successful design were a 22 percent reduction in total rotating mass, resist a linear deceleration rate of eight meters per second, and the centripetal forces of an angular velocity of 315 radians per second. Off-car testing revealed a four pound reduction in static rotor mass and achieved a 34 percent reduction in the moment of inertia. On-car testing involved data logging multiple laps at a local racetrack and displayed a higher theoretical peak temperature than the conventional design. For the composite structure, the heat was rejected earlier in the cool-down phase of the lap resulting in a higher steady state of absorption/radiation characteristics. Means of monitoring the performance are by way of a global positioning system (GPS) accelerometer and remote mounted infrared guns mounted to each hub. This design offers all the function of a conventional rotor with a 42 percent reduction in replacement cost and a 18 percent reduction in replacement time.

Poster Number

7

Faculty Mentor(s)

Charles Pringle

Department/Program

Engineering Technologies, Safety, & Construction

Additional Mentoring Department

Engineering Technologies, Safety, & Construction

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May 21st, 2:30 PM May 21st, 5:00 PM

A Composite Brake Rotor Assembly by Utilizing Replaceable Friction Surfaces

SURC Ballroom B/C/D

This project investigated a proof of concept design involving a rotor fabricated from aluminum with replaceable friction surfaces with greater or equal performance characteristics in order to reduce cost and maintenance. The replaceable friction surfaces provide a means to mitigate cost to the end user. The structure is constrained by the dimensions, 11.75” diameter and 1.25” width, and serves as a direct replacement rotor for a circle track racecar. Analyses provide a direct comparison in static mass, moments of inertia, and forced convection thermal calculations in order to determine if the concept was viable. Requirements for a successful design were a 22 percent reduction in total rotating mass, resist a linear deceleration rate of eight meters per second, and the centripetal forces of an angular velocity of 315 radians per second. Off-car testing revealed a four pound reduction in static rotor mass and achieved a 34 percent reduction in the moment of inertia. On-car testing involved data logging multiple laps at a local racetrack and displayed a higher theoretical peak temperature than the conventional design. For the composite structure, the heat was rejected earlier in the cool-down phase of the lap resulting in a higher steady state of absorption/radiation characteristics. Means of monitoring the performance are by way of a global positioning system (GPS) accelerometer and remote mounted infrared guns mounted to each hub. This design offers all the function of a conventional rotor with a 42 percent reduction in replacement cost and a 18 percent reduction in replacement time.