Title

The Subtleties of Soda

Presenter Information

Amanda Bury
Noah Charles

Document Type

Oral Presentation

Location

SURC Ballroom B/C/D

Start Date

21-5-2015

End Date

21-5-2015

Keywords

Ceramics, Utility, Atmospheric Firing

Abstract

Soda firing is an atmospheric ceramic firing process during which soda which usually consists of sodium bi-carbonate, also known as soda ash, is introduced into the kiln near peak temperature. Soda ash is most commonly mixed with hot water and sprayed directly into the kiln. Once subjected to the heat of the kiln, it vaporizes and bonds with the surfaces of the pots to form a sodium-silicate glaze. The award of the C. Farrell Scholarship in spring 2014 and fall 2014 provided the funds necessary to build a new wood-burning soda kiln and the opportunity for exploration and research of this firing method. The newly constructed kiln, located within the ceramics facilities on the Central Washington University Ellensburg campus, was built during spring of 2014. During the fall of 2014, investigation of this new type of firing technique and how utilitarian vessels lend their form to this process was conducted. The culmination of the award period ended in an exhibition featuring my utilitarian work that is representational of the soda-fired aesthetic. This construction and research provided me with beneficial exploration in areas of kiln construction and the utilization of the aesthetics of soda firing, creating a foundation of knowledge about applying those surface aesthetics to current and future artwork.

Poster Number

4

Faculty Mentor(s)

Stephen Robison

Department/Program

Art

Additional Mentoring Department

Art

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
May 21st, 11:30 AM May 21st, 2:00 PM

The Subtleties of Soda

SURC Ballroom B/C/D

Soda firing is an atmospheric ceramic firing process during which soda which usually consists of sodium bi-carbonate, also known as soda ash, is introduced into the kiln near peak temperature. Soda ash is most commonly mixed with hot water and sprayed directly into the kiln. Once subjected to the heat of the kiln, it vaporizes and bonds with the surfaces of the pots to form a sodium-silicate glaze. The award of the C. Farrell Scholarship in spring 2014 and fall 2014 provided the funds necessary to build a new wood-burning soda kiln and the opportunity for exploration and research of this firing method. The newly constructed kiln, located within the ceramics facilities on the Central Washington University Ellensburg campus, was built during spring of 2014. During the fall of 2014, investigation of this new type of firing technique and how utilitarian vessels lend their form to this process was conducted. The culmination of the award period ended in an exhibition featuring my utilitarian work that is representational of the soda-fired aesthetic. This construction and research provided me with beneficial exploration in areas of kiln construction and the utilization of the aesthetics of soda firing, creating a foundation of knowledge about applying those surface aesthetics to current and future artwork.