Title

Show Me the Money

Presenter Information

Austin Neff

Document Type

Oral Presentation

Location

SURC 271

Start Date

21-5-2015

End Date

21-5-2015

Keywords

Student-athlete, Compensation, Ethical Theory

Abstract

There are numerous ethical issues within the current structure of intercollegiate athletics. At present, one of the most hotly debated issues is the question of whether or not, in addition to their athletic scholarships, college athletes should receive financial compensation for playing in nationally televised games and having their likeness used to sell merchandise and concessions. This research investigates the issue from a philosophical perspective using an application of contractarian morality, an advanced ethical theory. Contractarianism analyzes ethical situations by viewing morality in terms of fairness of and agreeableness upon social contracts, such as the one between the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) and its athletes, to and from all parties involved. This research focuses on case studies, scholarly editorial pieces, and the disaggregation of primary source data. I will argue that college athletes who appear in nationally televised games are being undercompensated for the value they bring to their respective universities. This value is comprised mainly of monetary contributions from the sale of television packages and team merchandise but also includes benefits that are hard to quantify, such as increases in their university profile. The popular argument defending the current NCAA system is that student-athletes are fairly compensated through academic scholarships and other preferential treatment. I will refute this claim. It is imperative that we address this issue from an ethical perspective so we can help the NCAA to establish future policies that preserve the sanctity of higher education and are grounded in the principles of justice and equality

Faculty Mentor(s)

Michael Goerger

Department/Program

Philosophy & Religious Studies

Additional Mentoring Department

Philosophy & Religious Studies

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May 21st, 8:10 AM May 21st, 8:30 AM

Show Me the Money

SURC 271

There are numerous ethical issues within the current structure of intercollegiate athletics. At present, one of the most hotly debated issues is the question of whether or not, in addition to their athletic scholarships, college athletes should receive financial compensation for playing in nationally televised games and having their likeness used to sell merchandise and concessions. This research investigates the issue from a philosophical perspective using an application of contractarian morality, an advanced ethical theory. Contractarianism analyzes ethical situations by viewing morality in terms of fairness of and agreeableness upon social contracts, such as the one between the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) and its athletes, to and from all parties involved. This research focuses on case studies, scholarly editorial pieces, and the disaggregation of primary source data. I will argue that college athletes who appear in nationally televised games are being undercompensated for the value they bring to their respective universities. This value is comprised mainly of monetary contributions from the sale of television packages and team merchandise but also includes benefits that are hard to quantify, such as increases in their university profile. The popular argument defending the current NCAA system is that student-athletes are fairly compensated through academic scholarships and other preferential treatment. I will refute this claim. It is imperative that we address this issue from an ethical perspective so we can help the NCAA to establish future policies that preserve the sanctity of higher education and are grounded in the principles of justice and equality