Title

Rodriguez v. United States

Presenter Information

Elizabeth Allison

Document Type

Oral Presentation

Location

SURC 137A

Start Date

21-5-2015

End Date

21-5-2015

Keywords

Drug Detection, Dog Sniff, Consent

Abstract

Rodriguez v. United States explores the use of drug detection dogs by police officers while conducting routine stopDrug Detection, Dog Sniff, Consents. It examines the citizen's interest in privacy as opposed to the benefit to police of drug detection. Rodriguez argues that his traffic stop by police was complete but was unreasonably prolonged after he denied consent to a dog sniff of his car, and that the wait for a backup officer to arrive at the scene was beyond reasonable. The state argues that the delay was short and, therefore, the stop was reasonable. Since a drug detection dog is only trained to detect contraband, the invasion of privacy is minimal. This presentation examines both arguments that are before the Supreme Court of the United States and the implications for society.

Faculty Mentor(s)

Teresa Francis Divine

Department/Program

Law & Justice

Additional Mentoring Department

Law & Justice

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Rodriguez v. United States

SURC 137A

Rodriguez v. United States explores the use of drug detection dogs by police officers while conducting routine stopDrug Detection, Dog Sniff, Consents. It examines the citizen's interest in privacy as opposed to the benefit to police of drug detection. Rodriguez argues that his traffic stop by police was complete but was unreasonably prolonged after he denied consent to a dog sniff of his car, and that the wait for a backup officer to arrive at the scene was beyond reasonable. The state argues that the delay was short and, therefore, the stop was reasonable. Since a drug detection dog is only trained to detect contraband, the invasion of privacy is minimal. This presentation examines both arguments that are before the Supreme Court of the United States and the implications for society.