Title

United States of Surveillance

Presenter Information

Kyle James

Document Type

Oral Presentation

Location

SURC 137A

Start Date

21-5-2015

End Date

21-5-2015

Keywords

Surveillance, Cyber Security, Policy

Abstract

In June 2013, Americans learned that Orwell’s Big Brother was much more than speculation when ex-National Security Administration (NSA) contractor Edward Snowden leaked information on the NSA’s collection of telephony metadata and other national surveillance programs. Since the attacks of September 11, 2001, American citizens have paid the price and been victimized in the process of national security. Unfortunately, the current classified nature of the bills regulating these programs are not transparent enough to disclose information to the public. With the information world growing around us faster than we can develop laws and security to match, there is a greater need to reform the laws currently governing us to protect the autonomy of our personal data both big or small. This paper examines Internet privacy laws and regulations, the leaked surveillance programs that coattail these acts, evaluates the proposed legal reforms, and describes how to fight back as a citizen.

Faculty Mentor(s)

Todd Schaefer, Jackson Muhirwe

Department/Program

Political Science

Additional Mentoring Department

Political Science

Additional Mentoring Department

ITAM

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
May 21st, 3:40 PM May 21st, 4:00 PM

United States of Surveillance

SURC 137A

In June 2013, Americans learned that Orwell’s Big Brother was much more than speculation when ex-National Security Administration (NSA) contractor Edward Snowden leaked information on the NSA’s collection of telephony metadata and other national surveillance programs. Since the attacks of September 11, 2001, American citizens have paid the price and been victimized in the process of national security. Unfortunately, the current classified nature of the bills regulating these programs are not transparent enough to disclose information to the public. With the information world growing around us faster than we can develop laws and security to match, there is a greater need to reform the laws currently governing us to protect the autonomy of our personal data both big or small. This paper examines Internet privacy laws and regulations, the leaked surveillance programs that coattail these acts, evaluates the proposed legal reforms, and describes how to fight back as a citizen.