Title

The New Radicals: Education and Literature for the Emancipation of Russian Women

Presenter Information

Elizabeth Seelye

Document Type

Oral Presentation

Location

SURC 271

Start Date

21-5-2015

End Date

21-5-2015

Keywords

Russian Women, Radicalism, Literature, Education

Abstract

Russian literature of the 1860s served as a catalyst for upper-class Russian women to question the trajectory of Russian society and their place in it. Literature became one of the few outlets for young women to identify and articulate dissatisfaction with the inequality of educational options offered to them. Empowered by the literature of the 1860s that inspired women to step outside the sphere of domesticity, they became active members in the Russian revolutionary currents that were sweeping through the empire. They demanded equal educational rights, and when that was denied, they found ways to work around the oppressive bureaucratic system that was the Russian autocracy. Literature taught women that they should no longer view themselves as lesser members of society, but as individuals who were just as capable as their male counterparts. By demanding equal access to education along with literature that was inspiring women to become active in politics, women were becoming part of the radicalism that was sweeping through the empire.

Faculty Mentor(s)

Roxanne Easley

Department/Program

History

Additional Mentoring Department

History

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The New Radicals: Education and Literature for the Emancipation of Russian Women

SURC 271

Russian literature of the 1860s served as a catalyst for upper-class Russian women to question the trajectory of Russian society and their place in it. Literature became one of the few outlets for young women to identify and articulate dissatisfaction with the inequality of educational options offered to them. Empowered by the literature of the 1860s that inspired women to step outside the sphere of domesticity, they became active members in the Russian revolutionary currents that were sweeping through the empire. They demanded equal educational rights, and when that was denied, they found ways to work around the oppressive bureaucratic system that was the Russian autocracy. Literature taught women that they should no longer view themselves as lesser members of society, but as individuals who were just as capable as their male counterparts. By demanding equal access to education along with literature that was inspiring women to become active in politics, women were becoming part of the radicalism that was sweeping through the empire.