Title

Web-Tool Design for the Sciences

Document Type

Oral Presentation

Location

SURC 137B

Start Date

21-5-2015

End Date

21-5-2015

Keywords

Data Analysis, Online, Visualization

Abstract

When performing research in any given field, the use of custom-built software may be employed in order to facilitate a more expedient research process. Users of these programs are most often not computer specialists themselves and experience difficulty utilizing the software. We are developing a front-end platform that is capable of interfacing with back-end programs hosted on a server. The infrastructure integrates web development technologies (HTML, CSS, PHP), shell scripts utilizing gnuplot, and a locally hosted server. The HTML web-page invokes the scientific software, which has been reviewed and debugged for efficiency and run-time errors, before utilizing a shell script to generate statistical plots of functions. This script parses the hosted scientific software’s output and formats the data for gnuplot to extrapolate. The statistical and graphical plots are posted to the website’s front-end graphical user interface for the end user to analyze. This platform is currently being tested by implementing software that is in development by Elizabeth Brooks for biology (co)variance research at Central Washington University.

Faculty Mentor(s)

Filip Jagodzinski, Alison Scoville

Department/Program

Computer Science

Additional Mentoring Department

Computer Science

Additional Mentoring Department

Biology

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May 21st, 12:00 PM May 21st, 12:20 PM

Web-Tool Design for the Sciences

SURC 137B

When performing research in any given field, the use of custom-built software may be employed in order to facilitate a more expedient research process. Users of these programs are most often not computer specialists themselves and experience difficulty utilizing the software. We are developing a front-end platform that is capable of interfacing with back-end programs hosted on a server. The infrastructure integrates web development technologies (HTML, CSS, PHP), shell scripts utilizing gnuplot, and a locally hosted server. The HTML web-page invokes the scientific software, which has been reviewed and debugged for efficiency and run-time errors, before utilizing a shell script to generate statistical plots of functions. This script parses the hosted scientific software’s output and formats the data for gnuplot to extrapolate. The statistical and graphical plots are posted to the website’s front-end graphical user interface for the end user to analyze. This platform is currently being tested by implementing software that is in development by Elizabeth Brooks for biology (co)variance research at Central Washington University.