Title

Effect of Black Carbon Nanoparticles on Epithelial Cell Proliferation

Presenter Information

Naomi Beebe

Document Type

Oral Presentation

Location

SURC 140

Start Date

21-5-2015

End Date

21-5-2015

Keywords

Nanoparticle, Toxicity, Cellular

Abstract

Black carbon (BC) nano particles (NPs) have been shown to reduce cell proliferation leading to cell death, and they have been implicated in adverse health effects to the cardiovascular system. While the exact mechanisms of action are unknown, it is generally accepted that their role in the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is the main cause of these detrimental effects. Here, cell toxicity assays are performed to better understand the underlying mechanisms and relevant particle characteristics. Particles used in this study are derived from the combustion of fossil fuels, and are being characterized for surface area, surface speciation, and trace metal content. The cell proliferation assay, MTS, is applied to quantify the effects of the BC NPs on C10 cells, which are type II mouse lung epithelial cells. Preliminary data show a decrease in cell viability as the concentration of particles increases. Assays will also be performed on cells exposed to BC NPs with ferrous iron (Fe(II)) and anthraquinone (AQ), as results from previous studies correlated increased disruption of the electron transport chain with these two NP constituents in collected aerosol samples. Results from this work will complement data currently obtained on the generation of hydrogen peroxide in the presence of these particles in biologically relevant medium and allow us to better understand underlying mechanisms of cell disruption and what particle characteristics are key players in this process.

Faculty Mentor(s)

Anne Johansen, April Binder

Department/Program

Chemistry

Additional Mentoring Department

Chemistry

Additional Mentoring Department

Biology

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May 21st, 1:10 PM May 21st, 1:30 PM

Effect of Black Carbon Nanoparticles on Epithelial Cell Proliferation

SURC 140

Black carbon (BC) nano particles (NPs) have been shown to reduce cell proliferation leading to cell death, and they have been implicated in adverse health effects to the cardiovascular system. While the exact mechanisms of action are unknown, it is generally accepted that their role in the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is the main cause of these detrimental effects. Here, cell toxicity assays are performed to better understand the underlying mechanisms and relevant particle characteristics. Particles used in this study are derived from the combustion of fossil fuels, and are being characterized for surface area, surface speciation, and trace metal content. The cell proliferation assay, MTS, is applied to quantify the effects of the BC NPs on C10 cells, which are type II mouse lung epithelial cells. Preliminary data show a decrease in cell viability as the concentration of particles increases. Assays will also be performed on cells exposed to BC NPs with ferrous iron (Fe(II)) and anthraquinone (AQ), as results from previous studies correlated increased disruption of the electron transport chain with these two NP constituents in collected aerosol samples. Results from this work will complement data currently obtained on the generation of hydrogen peroxide in the presence of these particles in biologically relevant medium and allow us to better understand underlying mechanisms of cell disruption and what particle characteristics are key players in this process.