Title

theatre people: Representing Live Artists and Radical Hope

Presenter Information

Chelsea Roberts

Document Type

Oral Presentation

Location

SURC 271

Start Date

21-5-2015

End Date

21-5-2015

Keywords

Theatre, Experimental, Documentary

Abstract

theatre people is a visual project which attempts to represent a radical point of view for a non-specialist audience. I explore the changing role of the performing arts as a vehicle for social change by contrasting conversations with Millenial-aged theatre students and interviews with Living Theatre founder, Judith Malina. Now 88 years old, Malina has been jailed under a brutal dictatorship in Brazil; was on the front lines of political theatre in Gaza, Berlin, and Prague; and has contributed invaluably to the culture of American and global performance through anarchist, anti-capitalist performance practices. This short documentary creates a conversation with and between these generations of artists, and it is a project which has generated more hope than I expected. I have not employed the traditional expository style. Due to the subject matter, an authorial voice seemed out of the question. The film, thus, utilizes collage aesthetics as a way to represent the collective style of the Living Theatre, and the collaborative nature of theatre-making.

Faculty Mentor(s)

Lene Pedersen

Department/Program

Theatre

Additional Mentoring Department

Anthropology & Museum Studies

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May 21st, 1:30 PM May 21st, 1:50 PM

theatre people: Representing Live Artists and Radical Hope

SURC 271

theatre people is a visual project which attempts to represent a radical point of view for a non-specialist audience. I explore the changing role of the performing arts as a vehicle for social change by contrasting conversations with Millenial-aged theatre students and interviews with Living Theatre founder, Judith Malina. Now 88 years old, Malina has been jailed under a brutal dictatorship in Brazil; was on the front lines of political theatre in Gaza, Berlin, and Prague; and has contributed invaluably to the culture of American and global performance through anarchist, anti-capitalist performance practices. This short documentary creates a conversation with and between these generations of artists, and it is a project which has generated more hope than I expected. I have not employed the traditional expository style. Due to the subject matter, an authorial voice seemed out of the question. The film, thus, utilizes collage aesthetics as a way to represent the collective style of the Living Theatre, and the collaborative nature of theatre-making.