Title

Like Something Out of Stephen King

Presenter Information

T.J. Tranchell

Document Type

Oral Presentation

Location

SURC 135

Start Date

21-5-2015

End Date

21-5-2015

Keywords

Stephen King, Metafiction, Literature

Abstract

In the world of popular American literature, there is arguably no author more popular than Stephen King. Since the release of his first novel Carrie in 1974, there has rarely been a year without a new King book and invariably these books reach the bestseller lists. But Stephen King has not always been a household name. He has not always been America’s bogeyman. In this paper, I will seek to discover how Stephen King became Stephen King. More than just an author, King has become a brand, and a subgenre unto himself. King can also be read as text. Like the work he has produced, King is wrought with connections: from text-to-text and author-to-text. King is not only self-referential within works bearing his name, but has referenced himself in books published under a pseudonym, and has even become a character. Like Michel Foucault, I will not be “examining how the author became individualized in a culture like ours. . .” but rather exploring “the relationship between text and author and with the manner in which the text points to this ‘figure’ that, at least in appearance, is outside it and antecedes it.”

Faculty Mentor(s)

Liahna Armstrong

Department/Program

English

Additional Mentoring Department

English

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May 21st, 2:10 PM May 21st, 2:30 PM

Like Something Out of Stephen King

SURC 135

In the world of popular American literature, there is arguably no author more popular than Stephen King. Since the release of his first novel Carrie in 1974, there has rarely been a year without a new King book and invariably these books reach the bestseller lists. But Stephen King has not always been a household name. He has not always been America’s bogeyman. In this paper, I will seek to discover how Stephen King became Stephen King. More than just an author, King has become a brand, and a subgenre unto himself. King can also be read as text. Like the work he has produced, King is wrought with connections: from text-to-text and author-to-text. King is not only self-referential within works bearing his name, but has referenced himself in books published under a pseudonym, and has even become a character. Like Michel Foucault, I will not be “examining how the author became individualized in a culture like ours. . .” but rather exploring “the relationship between text and author and with the manner in which the text points to this ‘figure’ that, at least in appearance, is outside it and antecedes it.”