Title

Metatarsal Variation in Morphology of the Hallux in Non-Human Primates

Presenter Information

Daniel Jager

Document Type

Oral Presentation

Location

SURC Ballroom B/C/D

Start Date

21-5-2015

End Date

21-5-2015

Keywords

Functional Morphology, Anthropology, Primate

Abstract

Terrestrial and arboreal environments present different locomotive challenges for non-human primates. This study focuses on interpreting how those challenges impact the degree of proximal facet concavity of the hallux in New World and Old World monkeys. The study used measurements of halluces from 34 monkeys (Alouatta, Cebus, Lagothrix, Cercopithecus, Macaca, Miopithecus, and Papio) stored at the University of Oregon, and two (Macaca and Saimiri) at Central Washington University, using both traditional caliper methods and a MicroScribe three-dimensional digitizer. MicroScribe data included nine landmarks, five on the proximal articular surface and four on the distal. Caliper measurements followed Marchi (2010). Monkey species comprised four locomotor groups from least to most arboreal. Regressions of MicroScribe data came from principal component scores via EVAN’s Toolbox (Phillips et al., 2010). Locomotion alone was significant, however, size was a confounding variable. There was a significant correlation for locomotion and monkey size class combined, F(9, 28)=27.64, p<0.001, R2=92.90, R2 Adjusted=89.54. Size was the primary explanation for this variation, when looked at separately, F(7, 29)=26.40, p<0.001, R2=89.36, R2 Adjusted=85.98. While the results showed a difference between monkeys with extremely curved proximal articular surfaces and those with a flatter surface, it was difficult to correlate it to locomotion alone. The relationship between the relative flatness of the surface and allometry needs to be further explored.

Poster Number

50

Faculty Mentor(s)

Patrick Lubinski

Department/Program

Anthropology & Museum Studies

Additional Mentoring Department

Anthropology & Museum Studies

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May 21st, 11:30 AM May 21st, 2:00 PM

Metatarsal Variation in Morphology of the Hallux in Non-Human Primates

SURC Ballroom B/C/D

Terrestrial and arboreal environments present different locomotive challenges for non-human primates. This study focuses on interpreting how those challenges impact the degree of proximal facet concavity of the hallux in New World and Old World monkeys. The study used measurements of halluces from 34 monkeys (Alouatta, Cebus, Lagothrix, Cercopithecus, Macaca, Miopithecus, and Papio) stored at the University of Oregon, and two (Macaca and Saimiri) at Central Washington University, using both traditional caliper methods and a MicroScribe three-dimensional digitizer. MicroScribe data included nine landmarks, five on the proximal articular surface and four on the distal. Caliper measurements followed Marchi (2010). Monkey species comprised four locomotor groups from least to most arboreal. Regressions of MicroScribe data came from principal component scores via EVAN’s Toolbox (Phillips et al., 2010). Locomotion alone was significant, however, size was a confounding variable. There was a significant correlation for locomotion and monkey size class combined, F(9, 28)=27.64, p<0.001, R2=92.90, R2 Adjusted=89.54. Size was the primary explanation for this variation, when looked at separately, F(7, 29)=26.40, p<0.001, R2=89.36, R2 Adjusted=85.98. While the results showed a difference between monkeys with extremely curved proximal articular surfaces and those with a flatter surface, it was difficult to correlate it to locomotion alone. The relationship between the relative flatness of the surface and allometry needs to be further explored.