Title

The Effectiveness of New Age Instruction

Presenter Information

Brandon Purcell
Ashley Browne

Document Type

Oral Presentation

Location

SURC Ballroom B/C/D

Start Date

21-5-2015

End Date

21-5-2015

Keywords

Education, Technology, PHET

Abstract

The unprecedented increase of technology in the classroom has brought new modes of instruction that are yet to be determined as effective or ineffective. This project tests the effects of hands-on versus computer-simulated learning on content retention and critical thinking. We predicted that students would have higher content retention and critical thinking as a result of the hands-on lessons. We led students through one of two learning segments. In the first segment, half of the class studied circuits through a simulation, and half studied circuits through hands-on interaction. In the second segment, students switched to the opposite lesson style. In between each of these segments, students received an assessment to test their content retention and critical thinking gains. The lesson plan used was a 5E lesson plan model, where students are led through an inquiry process to explore concepts. During the first learning segment, students receiving the hands-on mode of instruction received higher scores than the PHET simulation by 15 percent. During the second learning segment, students receiving the hands-on mode of instruction saw a three percent increase compared to the PHET simulation group. While the results showed increased scores in hands-on instruction, the margins were not large enough to be a significant factor in test scores. Further refining and exploring the effectiveness of online simulations and, in particular, the effectiveness of the teacher delivering the mode of instruction is required to determine the effectiveness of new age technology.

Poster Number

34

Faculty Mentor(s)

Ian Quitadamo

Department/Program

Science Education

Additional Mentoring Department

Science Education

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
May 21st, 2:30 PM May 21st, 5:00 PM

The Effectiveness of New Age Instruction

SURC Ballroom B/C/D

The unprecedented increase of technology in the classroom has brought new modes of instruction that are yet to be determined as effective or ineffective. This project tests the effects of hands-on versus computer-simulated learning on content retention and critical thinking. We predicted that students would have higher content retention and critical thinking as a result of the hands-on lessons. We led students through one of two learning segments. In the first segment, half of the class studied circuits through a simulation, and half studied circuits through hands-on interaction. In the second segment, students switched to the opposite lesson style. In between each of these segments, students received an assessment to test their content retention and critical thinking gains. The lesson plan used was a 5E lesson plan model, where students are led through an inquiry process to explore concepts. During the first learning segment, students receiving the hands-on mode of instruction received higher scores than the PHET simulation by 15 percent. During the second learning segment, students receiving the hands-on mode of instruction saw a three percent increase compared to the PHET simulation group. While the results showed increased scores in hands-on instruction, the margins were not large enough to be a significant factor in test scores. Further refining and exploring the effectiveness of online simulations and, in particular, the effectiveness of the teacher delivering the mode of instruction is required to determine the effectiveness of new age technology.