Title

Student Use of Internet Video Lectures in Physics

Presenter Information

Patrick Penoyar

Document Type

Oral Presentation

Location

SURC Ballroom B/C/D

Start Date

21-5-2015

End Date

21-5-2015

Keywords

Physics, Education, Learning

Abstract

This study explored efficacy of student use of cloud-based video resources in supplementing regular physics instruction. Two groups of thirty students in Physics 112 classes took part in this study. As part of the regular course curriculum, each class had assigned web based homework. During the rotational motion and angular momentum unit of each class, references to supplemental instructional materials, applicable to problems on regular course homework were provided. The 9:30 a.m. class was provided with references to specific pages and examples in the course text book. The 7:30 a.m. class was provided with links to online supplemental physics videos. Data were collected at the beginning and end of the unit, via a pre- and post-test, attitude survey, and physics concept inventory. Additionally, view counts for online video resources were counted. The study found no significant learning gains in either student population as well as limited use of online video references.

Poster Number

36

Faculty Mentor(s)

Bruce Palmquist

Department/Program

Physics

Additional Mentoring Department

Physics

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May 21st, 2:30 PM May 21st, 5:00 PM

Student Use of Internet Video Lectures in Physics

SURC Ballroom B/C/D

This study explored efficacy of student use of cloud-based video resources in supplementing regular physics instruction. Two groups of thirty students in Physics 112 classes took part in this study. As part of the regular course curriculum, each class had assigned web based homework. During the rotational motion and angular momentum unit of each class, references to supplemental instructional materials, applicable to problems on regular course homework were provided. The 9:30 a.m. class was provided with references to specific pages and examples in the course text book. The 7:30 a.m. class was provided with links to online supplemental physics videos. Data were collected at the beginning and end of the unit, via a pre- and post-test, attitude survey, and physics concept inventory. Additionally, view counts for online video resources were counted. The study found no significant learning gains in either student population as well as limited use of online video references.