Title

Technology Usage and Relationship Satisfaction

Presenter Information

Michaela Rogers
Kirsten Jaenicke

Document Type

Oral Presentation

Location

SURC Ballroom B/C/D

Start Date

21-5-2015

End Date

21-5-2015

Keywords

Relationships, Satisfaction, Technology

Abstract

Technology has increasingly become a part of daily life, so it is important to identify how its use impacts relationships. Previous studies have found correlations between various types of technology use and relationship satisfaction. For instance, frequent cell phone use is associated with low relationship satisfaction (Coyne et al., 2011). Another study found that making the relationship official on a Facebook profile is associated with high relationship satisfaction whereas talking about relationship disagreements on Facebook is associated with low relationship satisfaction (Papp et al., 2012). The current study adds to the existing literature by further examining the association between technology and relationship satisfaction, but by specifically examining technology use while with one’s romantic partner and perceptions of partners’ technology use. The study involved collection of anonymous surveys from 124 participants between the ages of 18 and 45. Survey links were posted on social media sites. All participants were in romantic relationships during the study and responded to 21 questions about technology usage and relationship satisfaction. Results indicated no association between personal technology use and relationship satisfaction; however, there was a negative association between perceived partner technology use and relationship satisfaction, and between technology satisfaction and relationship satisfaction. Specifically, when participants perceived that their partner used technology often, they reported lower relationship satisfaction. Participants who reported satisfaction with their technology use tended to report high relationship satisfaction. The results suggest that perceptions and evaluations of technology use may be more important than actual use in predicting relationship satisfaction.

Poster Number

40

Faculty Mentor(s)

Amy Claridge

Department/Program

Family and Consumer Sciences

Additional Mentoring Department

Family and Consumer Sciences

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
May 21st, 2:30 PM May 21st, 5:00 PM

Technology Usage and Relationship Satisfaction

SURC Ballroom B/C/D

Technology has increasingly become a part of daily life, so it is important to identify how its use impacts relationships. Previous studies have found correlations between various types of technology use and relationship satisfaction. For instance, frequent cell phone use is associated with low relationship satisfaction (Coyne et al., 2011). Another study found that making the relationship official on a Facebook profile is associated with high relationship satisfaction whereas talking about relationship disagreements on Facebook is associated with low relationship satisfaction (Papp et al., 2012). The current study adds to the existing literature by further examining the association between technology and relationship satisfaction, but by specifically examining technology use while with one’s romantic partner and perceptions of partners’ technology use. The study involved collection of anonymous surveys from 124 participants between the ages of 18 and 45. Survey links were posted on social media sites. All participants were in romantic relationships during the study and responded to 21 questions about technology usage and relationship satisfaction. Results indicated no association between personal technology use and relationship satisfaction; however, there was a negative association between perceived partner technology use and relationship satisfaction, and between technology satisfaction and relationship satisfaction. Specifically, when participants perceived that their partner used technology often, they reported lower relationship satisfaction. Participants who reported satisfaction with their technology use tended to report high relationship satisfaction. The results suggest that perceptions and evaluations of technology use may be more important than actual use in predicting relationship satisfaction.