Title

Maternal Labor Force Participation and Attitudes About Work-Family Balance

Presenter Information

Brittany Wold

Document Type

Oral Presentation

Location

SURC Ballroom B/C/D

Start Date

21-5-2015

End Date

21-5-2015

Keywords

Labor Force, Maternal

Abstract

The purpose of this investigation was to determine whether maternal labor force participation in childhood impacts later attitudes about how families should balance work and family responsibilities. Participants completed an anonymous online survey, n=177. Results showed that some attitudes differed depending on maternal labor force participation. Children of mothers who were employed full time were more likely to endorse statements in support of stay-at-home fathers and mothers’ participation in the workforce. Similarly, children of working mothers also endorsed that mothers should prioritize their participation in the labor force to the same degree that fathers do. Those whose mothers stayed home were more likely to agree to a statement in support of mothers taking as much time off work as they feel necessary. Findings suggest that maternal labor force participation may shape their child’s later views towards how men and women should divide work and family responsibilities.

Poster Number

42

Faculty Mentor(s)

Sarah Feeney

Department/Program

Family and Consumer Sciences

Additional Mentoring Department

Family and Consumer Sciences

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May 21st, 2:30 PM May 21st, 5:00 PM

Maternal Labor Force Participation and Attitudes About Work-Family Balance

SURC Ballroom B/C/D

The purpose of this investigation was to determine whether maternal labor force participation in childhood impacts later attitudes about how families should balance work and family responsibilities. Participants completed an anonymous online survey, n=177. Results showed that some attitudes differed depending on maternal labor force participation. Children of mothers who were employed full time were more likely to endorse statements in support of stay-at-home fathers and mothers’ participation in the workforce. Similarly, children of working mothers also endorsed that mothers should prioritize their participation in the labor force to the same degree that fathers do. Those whose mothers stayed home were more likely to agree to a statement in support of mothers taking as much time off work as they feel necessary. Findings suggest that maternal labor force participation may shape their child’s later views towards how men and women should divide work and family responsibilities.